#3085 – 1996 32c Folk Heroes: John Henry

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.75FREE with 350 points!
$1.75
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.00
$1.00
3 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM644215x46mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50230x45mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420330x45mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
U.S. #3085
1996 32¢ John Henry
Folk Heroes

Issue Date: July 11, 1996
City: Anaheim, CA
Quantity: 23,681,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.1 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
John Henry – Hero of Railroad Men
Of all America’s tall tale heroes, John Henry was a real flesh-and-blood man. He worked as a gandy dancer – a steel-driving man, for the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad. In 1870, while drilling in the Big Bend Tunnel in West Virginia (seen on the front), John Henry died.
 
Shortly after that, both John Henry songs and stories sprang up. Songs set the rhythm for the grueling work on the line. The stories initiated new hands to the fraternity of steel-driving men – the men who moved mountains with sweat and blood so that the country could be bound together with iron rails. At the height of rail power, more than 100 hammer songs and over 100 ballads existed. One-upmanship, of course, made each tale more fantastic with the telling. 
 
John Henry was special from birth. In some tales, he weighs 44 pounds; in others, he walks and talks at birth. In still others, he is born with a hammer in his hand. Full grown, John Henry could do anything that required muscle, and did it well. But more than anything else, John Henry’s passion was to be a steel-drivin’ man. Finally he was, and he was the best there ever was.
 
That’s why John Henry pitted his muscles against the muscle of a steam engine – and won. But he died in the doing with his hammer in his hand, gaining immortality.
 
Read More - Click Here


  • 2021 First-Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty 2021 First Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty

    In 2021, the United States Postal Service anticipated the arrival of spring with a new set of 10 Forever stamps honoring Garden Beauty.  Order yours today!

    $10.95- $64.95
    BUY NOW
  • Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels  May Include Targets, Stars, Numbers, or Grids. Set of 5 with small imperfections Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels
    Since they first appeared in the 19th century, fancy cancels have been extremely sought-after by collectors.  Act now to add five of these to your collection.  Stamps may vary, but that's half the fun!
    $12.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers honored the American flag, Alexander Hamilton, Religious Freedom, Overland Mail, NATO, and more.  This money saving offer saves you over $90!  Order your set today.
    $89.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3085
1996 32¢ John Henry
Folk Heroes

Issue Date: July 11, 1996
City: Anaheim, CA
Quantity: 23,681,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.1 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
John Henry – Hero of Railroad Men
Of all America’s tall tale heroes, John Henry was a real flesh-and-blood man. He worked as a gandy dancer – a steel-driving man, for the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad. In 1870, while drilling in the Big Bend Tunnel in West Virginia (seen on the front), John Henry died.
 
Shortly after that, both John Henry songs and stories sprang up. Songs set the rhythm for the grueling work on the line. The stories initiated new hands to the fraternity of steel-driving men – the men who moved mountains with sweat and blood so that the country could be bound together with iron rails. At the height of rail power, more than 100 hammer songs and over 100 ballads existed. One-upmanship, of course, made each tale more fantastic with the telling. 
 
John Henry was special from birth. In some tales, he weighs 44 pounds; in others, he walks and talks at birth. In still others, he is born with a hammer in his hand. Full grown, John Henry could do anything that required muscle, and did it well. But more than anything else, John Henry’s passion was to be a steel-drivin’ man. Finally he was, and he was the best there ever was.
 
That’s why John Henry pitted his muscles against the muscle of a steam engine – and won. But he died in the doing with his hammer in his hand, gaining immortality.