#30A – 1860 5c Jefferson, brown, T2

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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$1,250.00
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$375.00
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$650.00
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- MM63825 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 33 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-5/16 inches)
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- MM638 25 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 33 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-5/16 inches)
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- MM216850 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 29 x 33 millimeters (1-1/8 x 1-5/16 inches)
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- MM4201Mystic Clear Mount 29x33mm - 50 precut mounts
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U.S. #30A
Series of 1857-61 5¢ Jefferson
Type II
 
Earliest Known Use: May 4, 1860
Quantity issued: 825,000 (estimate)
Printed by: Toppan, Carpenter & Co.
Printing Method: Flat plate
Watermark: None
Perforation: 15.5
Color: Brown
 
U.S. #30A closely resembles the imperforate U.S. #12 and U.S. 27-30. While the 5¢ Jefferson Type I stamp has complete projections, the projections on this Type II stamp are partially cut away at the top and bottom.
 
An Innovation is U.S. Stamps
When the world’s first postage stamps were released, no provision was made for separating the stamps from one another. Post office clerks and stamp users merely cut these “imperforates” apart with scissors or tore them along the edge of a metal ruler. A device was needed which would separate the stamps more easily and accurately.
 
In 1847, Irishman Henry Archer patented a machine that punched holes horizontally and vertically between rows of stamps. Now stamps could be separated without cutting. Perforations enabled stamps to adhere better to envelopes. He sold his invention to the British Treasury in 1853. That same year, Great Britain produced its first perforated stamps.
 
The 1857-61 issues were the first perforated U.S. stamps. Their designs were reproduced from the imperforate plates of 1851. Because the same plates were used, the perforate stamp types don’t differ much from the corresponding imperforate stamps. The entire series (U.S. #18-39) is noted for having narrow margins.
 
 
 
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U.S. #30A
Series of 1857-61 5¢ Jefferson
Type II
 
Earliest Known Use: May 4, 1860
Quantity issued: 825,000 (estimate)
Printed by: Toppan, Carpenter & Co.
Printing Method: Flat plate
Watermark: None
Perforation: 15.5
Color: Brown
 
U.S. #30A closely resembles the imperforate U.S. #12 and U.S. 27-30. While the 5¢ Jefferson Type I stamp has complete projections, the projections on this Type II stamp are partially cut away at the top and bottom.
 
An Innovation is U.S. Stamps
When the world’s first postage stamps were released, no provision was made for separating the stamps from one another. Post office clerks and stamp users merely cut these “imperforates” apart with scissors or tore them along the edge of a metal ruler. A device was needed which would separate the stamps more easily and accurately.
 
In 1847, Irishman Henry Archer patented a machine that punched holes horizontally and vertically between rows of stamps. Now stamps could be separated without cutting. Perforations enabled stamps to adhere better to envelopes. He sold his invention to the British Treasury in 1853. That same year, Great Britain produced its first perforated stamps.
 
The 1857-61 issues were the first perforated U.S. stamps. Their designs were reproduced from the imperforate plates of 1851. Because the same plates were used, the perforate stamp types don’t differ much from the corresponding imperforate stamps. The entire series (U.S. #18-39) is noted for having narrow margins.