#3121 – 1997 32c Brig. Gen. Benjamin O. Davis Sr

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.30
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.20
5 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM62250 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 32 x 47 millimeters (1-1/4 x 1-7/8 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$4.75
- MM4203Mystic Clear Mount 30x45mm - 50 precut mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.95
U.S. #3121
1997 32¢ Benjamin Oliver Davis, Sr.
Black Heritage Series

Issue Date: January 28, 1997
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 112,000,000
Printed By: Banknote Corp. of America
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine die cut11.4
Color: Multicolored
 
The first black brigadier general and a driving force in the eventual integration of the U.S. armed forces, Benjamin Oliver Davis, Sr. became the 20th American honored in the Black Heritage Series.
 
Born July 1, 1877 in Washington, D.C., Davis devoted much of his life to a distinguished military career that spanned 50 years. Enlisting as a private in the military service on July 13, 1898, he rose through the ranks, and in 1905 received a promotion to first lieutenant. That same year he also began teaching as a professor of military science at Wilberforce University in Ohio. He later taught at the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama as well. Promoted to colonel in 1930, he went on to become the first black soldier to achieve the rank of general in 1940.
 
During World War II Davis served in the European theater. As an adviser on race relations, he championed the idea of an all-inclusive armed services. On July 26, 1948, six days after Davis retired, President Truman issued the order ending racial discrimination in the military.
 
The stamp shows Davis at the height of his career, on an inspection tour of the American front in France in 1944. His son, Benjamin Oliver Davis, Jr., commander of the famed Tuskegee Airmen, went on to become the first black three-star lieutenant general in the U.S. armed forces.
Read More - Click Here

  • U.S. Album with 100 postally used stamps, 1,000 hinges, and a free stamp collecting guide U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps 3-Volume American Heirloom Album

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Mystic Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Volume I, 1847-1934 Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3121
1997 32¢ Benjamin Oliver Davis, Sr.
Black Heritage Series

Issue Date: January 28, 1997
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 112,000,000
Printed By: Banknote Corp. of America
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine die cut11.4
Color: Multicolored
 
The first black brigadier general and a driving force in the eventual integration of the U.S. armed forces, Benjamin Oliver Davis, Sr. became the 20th American honored in the Black Heritage Series.
 
Born July 1, 1877 in Washington, D.C., Davis devoted much of his life to a distinguished military career that spanned 50 years. Enlisting as a private in the military service on July 13, 1898, he rose through the ranks, and in 1905 received a promotion to first lieutenant. That same year he also began teaching as a professor of military science at Wilberforce University in Ohio. He later taught at the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama as well. Promoted to colonel in 1930, he went on to become the first black soldier to achieve the rank of general in 1940.
 
During World War II Davis served in the European theater. As an adviser on race relations, he championed the idea of an all-inclusive armed services. On July 26, 1948, six days after Davis retired, President Truman issued the order ending racial discrimination in the military.
 
The stamp shows Davis at the height of his career, on an inspection tour of the American front in France in 1944. His son, Benjamin Oliver Davis, Jr., commander of the famed Tuskegee Airmen, went on to become the first black three-star lieutenant general in the U.S. armed forces.