#3131 – 1997 32c Stagecoach

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U.S. #3131
1997 32¢ Stagecoach
 
Issue Date: March 13, 1997
City: New York, NY
Quantity: 130,000,000
Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations:
11.2
Color: Red
 
Issued for Pacific ’97 International Philatelic Exhibition in San Francisco, America’s first triangular stamps commemorate 150 years of American postage stamps.
 
Stagecoaches played a vital role in postal history, providing the first scheduled mail service in modern times. In the early 1700s, England saw the dawning of the Industrial Revolution. And as economic activity increased, merchants clamored for a faster, more reliable mail system. To meet the demand, entrepreneurs initiated scheduled stagecoach services, while the government implemented a systematic road-building plan to develop a reliable transportation network. 
 
Here in America, colonial postal service manager Benjamin Franklin followed England’s example and established scheduled mail service. By the mid-1700s, stagecoach and mail service linked the major cities of the East Coast. In 1840, the introduction of the world’s first postpaid, self-adhesive postage stamp – England’s Penny Black – further boosted economic activity. 
 
Together, stagecoaches and postage stamps laid the foundation for a mail system that was fast, reliable, and efficient. Though stagecoaches were quickly replaced by railroads, they continued to provide vital services to inaccessible places into the 20th century.
 

First U.S. Triangle Stamps

On March 13, 1997, the USPS issued its first triangle-shaped stamps to promote the upcoming Pacific ’97 Stamp Show.

The world’s first triangle-shaped stamps came 144 years earlier.  Issued in 1853, the British colony Cape of Good Hope’s very first stamps were triangle-shaped.  They were reportedly created in that shape to help illiterate postal clerks easily identify the difference in letters that were mailed from within the colony from those that were mailed from other places.

Over the course of a decade, Cape of Good Hope would produce several more triangle stamps, totaling 12 by 1863.  You can view some of these triangle stamps here.  The next triangle stamps from another postal administration came from Newfoundland, then a British colony in 1857.  These and many other early triangle stamps were imperforate.  The first nation to issue perforated triangle stamps was Ecuador in 1908.  Over the next several decades, more nations would join in the fun and issue over 1,600 triangle stamps.

In 1997, the US joined as well with a special pair of stamps promoting the upcoming Pacific ’97 Stamp Show.  The two stamps were issued on March 13, 1997, at the New York Coliseum as part of the March MEGA Stamp Event.  According to the postmaster general, “These innovative stamps represent our commitment to provide the philatelic community and the American public with exciting new designs and formats… Since 1847, when the first US postage stamps were issued, stamps have been rectangular in shape.  We want the American public to know stamps aren’t square.”

The two stamps honored the brave settlers who opened the American West by land and sea.  They picture a mid-19th-century clipper ship and a US mail stagecoach – both of which are historically associated with mail delivery in California.  The ship design is based on an advertising card for the clipper ship Richard S. Ely.  These small cards were handed out in Eastern cities to encourage people to travel to California by ship.  The stagecoach design is based on a drawing by Harrison Eastman (1823-1886), who worked as a postal clerk in San Francisco until his art career took off.

A decade later, the USPS produced its second triangle issue, honoring the settlement of Jamestown.  That stamp pictured the three ships, Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery that brought English colonists to America in 1607.  Calling their settlement Jamestown, after England’s King James I, the colonists founded the first permanent settlement in the new world.  The stamp commemorated Jamestown’s 400th anniversary and honors the colony’s first triangular-shaped fort.

See more great Pacific ’97 and triangle stamps below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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U.S. #3131
1997 32¢ Stagecoach
 
Issue Date: March 13, 1997
City: New York, NY
Quantity: 130,000,000
Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations:
11.2
Color: Red
 
Issued for Pacific ’97 International Philatelic Exhibition in San Francisco, America’s first triangular stamps commemorate 150 years of American postage stamps.
 
Stagecoaches played a vital role in postal history, providing the first scheduled mail service in modern times. In the early 1700s, England saw the dawning of the Industrial Revolution. And as economic activity increased, merchants clamored for a faster, more reliable mail system. To meet the demand, entrepreneurs initiated scheduled stagecoach services, while the government implemented a systematic road-building plan to develop a reliable transportation network. 
 
Here in America, colonial postal service manager Benjamin Franklin followed England’s example and established scheduled mail service. By the mid-1700s, stagecoach and mail service linked the major cities of the East Coast. In 1840, the introduction of the world’s first postpaid, self-adhesive postage stamp – England’s Penny Black – further boosted economic activity. 
 
Together, stagecoaches and postage stamps laid the foundation for a mail system that was fast, reliable, and efficient. Though stagecoaches were quickly replaced by railroads, they continued to provide vital services to inaccessible places into the 20th century.
 

First U.S. Triangle Stamps

On March 13, 1997, the USPS issued its first triangle-shaped stamps to promote the upcoming Pacific ’97 Stamp Show.

The world’s first triangle-shaped stamps came 144 years earlier.  Issued in 1853, the British colony Cape of Good Hope’s very first stamps were triangle-shaped.  They were reportedly created in that shape to help illiterate postal clerks easily identify the difference in letters that were mailed from within the colony from those that were mailed from other places.

Over the course of a decade, Cape of Good Hope would produce several more triangle stamps, totaling 12 by 1863.  You can view some of these triangle stamps here.  The next triangle stamps from another postal administration came from Newfoundland, then a British colony in 1857.  These and many other early triangle stamps were imperforate.  The first nation to issue perforated triangle stamps was Ecuador in 1908.  Over the next several decades, more nations would join in the fun and issue over 1,600 triangle stamps.

In 1997, the US joined as well with a special pair of stamps promoting the upcoming Pacific ’97 Stamp Show.  The two stamps were issued on March 13, 1997, at the New York Coliseum as part of the March MEGA Stamp Event.  According to the postmaster general, “These innovative stamps represent our commitment to provide the philatelic community and the American public with exciting new designs and formats… Since 1847, when the first US postage stamps were issued, stamps have been rectangular in shape.  We want the American public to know stamps aren’t square.”

The two stamps honored the brave settlers who opened the American West by land and sea.  They picture a mid-19th-century clipper ship and a US mail stagecoach – both of which are historically associated with mail delivery in California.  The ship design is based on an advertising card for the clipper ship Richard S. Ely.  These small cards were handed out in Eastern cities to encourage people to travel to California by ship.  The stagecoach design is based on a drawing by Harrison Eastman (1823-1886), who worked as a postal clerk in San Francisco until his art career took off.

A decade later, the USPS produced its second triangle issue, honoring the settlement of Jamestown.  That stamp pictured the three ships, Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery that brought English colonists to America in 1607.  Calling their settlement Jamestown, after England’s King James I, the colonists founded the first permanent settlement in the new world.  The stamp commemorated Jamestown’s 400th anniversary and honors the colony’s first triangular-shaped fort.

See more great Pacific ’97 and triangle stamps below.