#3182e – 1998 32c St. Louis World Fair-Single

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U.S. #3182e
1998 32¢ St. Louis World’s Fair
Celebrate the Century – 1900s

Issue Date: February 3, 1998
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 12,533,333
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 ½
Color: Multicolored
 
A world’s fair is an international exposition with special exhibits, entertainment, and cultural activities. It is a major event, running for months and attracting millions of people. New inventions, foods, and art are features of a world’s fair. America’s earliest world’s fair was held in 1853 in New York City, but the success and popularity of these fairs in the United States actually began with the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876.
 
The Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904 is also called the St. Louis World’s Fair. Nearly 20 million people attended this fair held in Forest Park in St. Louis, Missouri. Visitors there saw early automobiles, with one car driven from New York City. The Ferris wheel was brought in from Chicago, where it had been built for the 1893 World’s Fair. At the St. Louis fair, people tasted iced tea and ice cream cones for the first time.
 
For well over a century, world’s fairs have influenced American life – in advertising, entertainment, literature, architecture, and even in the development of our museums. International expositions are showcases for abundance in agriculture, advances in technology, and worldwide interests in science and culture. President McKinley called expositions like the St. Louis World’s Fair “timekeepers of progress.”
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U.S. #3182e
1998 32¢ St. Louis World’s Fair
Celebrate the Century – 1900s

Issue Date: February 3, 1998
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 12,533,333
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 ½
Color: Multicolored
 
A world’s fair is an international exposition with special exhibits, entertainment, and cultural activities. It is a major event, running for months and attracting millions of people. New inventions, foods, and art are features of a world’s fair. America’s earliest world’s fair was held in 1853 in New York City, but the success and popularity of these fairs in the United States actually began with the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876.
 
The Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904 is also called the St. Louis World’s Fair. Nearly 20 million people attended this fair held in Forest Park in St. Louis, Missouri. Visitors there saw early automobiles, with one car driven from New York City. The Ferris wheel was brought in from Chicago, where it had been built for the 1893 World’s Fair. At the St. Louis fair, people tasted iced tea and ice cream cones for the first time.
 
For well over a century, world’s fairs have influenced American life – in advertising, entertainment, literature, architecture, and even in the development of our museums. International expositions are showcases for abundance in agriculture, advances in technology, and worldwide interests in science and culture. President McKinley called expositions like the St. Louis World’s Fair “timekeepers of progress.”