#3182m – 1998 32c Gibson Girl-Single

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U.S. #3182m
1998 32¢ Gibson Girl
Celebrate the Century – 1900s

Issue Date: February 3, 1998
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 12,533,333
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 ½
Color: Multicolored
 
In the series of 15 stamps celebrating the first decade of the 20th century, the Gibson Girl stamp is the only one printed using line engraving. The image of the Gibson Girl on this stamp is based on a wallpaper design published in 1902 by Life Publishing Company.
 
The Gibson Girl first appeared in illustrations in a weekly humor magazine called Life. The creation of illustrator Charles Dana Gibson, she represented the ideal of American femininity at the turn of the century. She was intended to be a typical society woman, portrayed in pen and ink drawings as attractive and intelligent.
 
The weekly series of illustrated stories was a favorite with Gibson Girl fans. Her popularity also carried over to other products licensed to portray her image. She appeared on china plates, silverware, and pillows, as well as on the Gibson Girl wallpaper. 
 
With his “girl,” Charles Dana Gibson actually created a distinctive female look. The upswept hair, long neckline, and fashionable dress became a popular style for a generation of women. Although Gibson created other popular serials and illustrations, the Gibson Girl remains the best known of his drawings and is characteristic of his fine line style. The artist’s vision of beauty launched one of the earliest, uniquely American fashion trends.
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U.S. #3182m
1998 32¢ Gibson Girl
Celebrate the Century – 1900s

Issue Date: February 3, 1998
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 12,533,333
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 ½
Color: Multicolored
 
In the series of 15 stamps celebrating the first decade of the 20th century, the Gibson Girl stamp is the only one printed using line engraving. The image of the Gibson Girl on this stamp is based on a wallpaper design published in 1902 by Life Publishing Company.
 
The Gibson Girl first appeared in illustrations in a weekly humor magazine called Life. The creation of illustrator Charles Dana Gibson, she represented the ideal of American femininity at the turn of the century. She was intended to be a typical society woman, portrayed in pen and ink drawings as attractive and intelligent.
 
The weekly series of illustrated stories was a favorite with Gibson Girl fans. Her popularity also carried over to other products licensed to portray her image. She appeared on china plates, silverware, and pillows, as well as on the Gibson Girl wallpaper. 
 
With his “girl,” Charles Dana Gibson actually created a distinctive female look. The upswept hair, long neckline, and fashionable dress became a popular style for a generation of women. Although Gibson created other popular serials and illustrations, the Gibson Girl remains the best known of his drawings and is characteristic of his fine line style. The artist’s vision of beauty launched one of the earliest, uniquely American fashion trends.