#3183j – 1998 32c Celebrate the Century - 1910s: Boy and Girl Scouting

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U.S. #3183j
32¢ Scouting Founded
 Celebrate the Century – 1910s
 
Issue Date: February 3, 1998
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Scouting groups were first started in England in 1907, when Lord Robert Baden-Powell began the Boy Scouts movement. When girls became interested in belonging to a similar group, he helped his sister Agnes Baden-Powell organize the Girl Guides program as well. Scouting quickly spread to other countries.
 
A British Boy Scout helped American businessman William D. Boyce find his way in London’s fog. Boyce then worked with others to found the Boy Scouts of America in 1910. The Handbook for Boys was published that same year. Some of the scouts’ early contributions to their communities and their country were made to support Americans during World War I.
 
Juliette Gordon Low established Girl Guiding in the United States in 1912 and changed the name to Girl Scouting. The official name of the organization is Girl Scouts of the U.S.A.
 
Both of these programs were developed to teach young people good citizenship and leadership, along with encouraging special interests and developing other important skills. Currently, there are over 5 million Boy Scouts and over 3 million Girl Scouts in the United States. These memberships continue to be linked nationally and worldwide.
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U.S. #3183j
32¢ Scouting Founded
 Celebrate the Century – 1910s
 
Issue Date: February 3, 1998
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Scouting groups were first started in England in 1907, when Lord Robert Baden-Powell began the Boy Scouts movement. When girls became interested in belonging to a similar group, he helped his sister Agnes Baden-Powell organize the Girl Guides program as well. Scouting quickly spread to other countries.
 
A British Boy Scout helped American businessman William D. Boyce find his way in London’s fog. Boyce then worked with others to found the Boy Scouts of America in 1910. The Handbook for Boys was published that same year. Some of the scouts’ early contributions to their communities and their country were made to support Americans during World War I.
 
Juliette Gordon Low established Girl Guiding in the United States in 1912 and changed the name to Girl Scouting. The official name of the organization is Girl Scouts of the U.S.A.
 
Both of these programs were developed to teach young people good citizenship and leadership, along with encouraging special interests and developing other important skills. Currently, there are over 5 million Boy Scouts and over 3 million Girl Scouts in the United States. These memberships continue to be linked nationally and worldwide.