#3184f – 1998 32c Celebrate the Century - 1920s: Emily Post

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U.S. #3184f
32¢ Emily Post’s Etiquette
 Celebrate the Century – 1920s
 
Issue Date: May 28, 1998
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Emily Price Post (1872-1960) made good manners her lifework. Established as an authority on proper behavior, her common-sense views made her a hit with people from all walks of life – working class and high-society alike.
 
The daughter of a well-to-do architect, Post was born in Baltimore, Maryland, to wealth and high social position. At five years of age, she and her family moved to New York City. In 1893, she married Edwin M. Post, a banker who lost his fortune in the panic of 1901. They were divorced soon after.
 
Post began her career writing fiction and magazine articles. At her publisher’s suggestion, she wrote Etiquette in Society, in Business, in Politics and at Home. The book was an instant success after its release in 1922. What set Post apart from earlier writers on the subject was her focus on the common man; she recognized that, regardless of social standing, people were aware of the need for good manners and consideration for others.
 
By the time of her death, there had been 10 editions and 90 printings of Emily Post’s Etiquette. Frequent revisions were made, incorporating changing attitudes and new patterns of behavior. She also wrote a syndicated advice column, which appeared in over 200 newspapers.
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U.S. #3184f
32¢ Emily Post’s Etiquette
 Celebrate the Century – 1920s
 
Issue Date: May 28, 1998
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Emily Price Post (1872-1960) made good manners her lifework. Established as an authority on proper behavior, her common-sense views made her a hit with people from all walks of life – working class and high-society alike.
 
The daughter of a well-to-do architect, Post was born in Baltimore, Maryland, to wealth and high social position. At five years of age, she and her family moved to New York City. In 1893, she married Edwin M. Post, a banker who lost his fortune in the panic of 1901. They were divorced soon after.
 
Post began her career writing fiction and magazine articles. At her publisher’s suggestion, she wrote Etiquette in Society, in Business, in Politics and at Home. The book was an instant success after its release in 1922. What set Post apart from earlier writers on the subject was her focus on the common man; she recognized that, regardless of social standing, people were aware of the need for good manners and consideration for others.
 
By the time of her death, there had been 10 editions and 90 printings of Emily Post’s Etiquette. Frequent revisions were made, incorporating changing attitudes and new patterns of behavior. She also wrote a syndicated advice column, which appeared in over 200 newspapers.