#3185f – 1998 32c Superman arrives-single

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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camera Mystic First Day Cover
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$2.95
camera Classic First Day Cover
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camera Fleetwood First Day Cover
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Grading Guide

U.S. #3185f
32¢ Superman Arrives
Celebrate the Century – 1930s
 
Issue Date: September 10, 1998
City: Cleveland, OH
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton–Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Superman was created in 1934 by two Cleveland teenagers, writer Jerry Siegel and artist Joe Shuster. The duo had hoped to land their hero in the newspapers with a daily adventure comic strip, but had no luck; editors and publishers felt that their hero was simply too strange. While Siegel and Shuster shopped their hero around to comic strip syndicates and comic book publishers, their work on characters like Dr. Occult started appearing in DC Comics. Finally, in June 1938, the Man of Tomorrow made his debut as the lead feature in Action Comics #1.
 
This colorful new brand of hero was an alien in human form that had fallen to Earth as a child. He was stunningly handsome, endowed with supernatural powers, and fought for Truth, Justice and the American Way. His only weakness was the mysterious green mineral known as kryptonite.
 
Like any superhero, Superman needed an alter ego. So, when he was not fighting crime, he was known as Clark Kent, the mild-mannered reporter for the Daily Planet. Soon, Clark developed an interest in another reporter, Lois Lane. Lois, however, was in love with Superman. Superman, in turn, was so involved in crime fighting that he never returned her advances. Superman has been a popular American hero for more than 60 years.
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U.S. #3185f
32¢ Superman Arrives
Celebrate the Century – 1930s
 
Issue Date: September 10, 1998
City: Cleveland, OH
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton–Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Superman was created in 1934 by two Cleveland teenagers, writer Jerry Siegel and artist Joe Shuster. The duo had hoped to land their hero in the newspapers with a daily adventure comic strip, but had no luck; editors and publishers felt that their hero was simply too strange. While Siegel and Shuster shopped their hero around to comic strip syndicates and comic book publishers, their work on characters like Dr. Occult started appearing in DC Comics. Finally, in June 1938, the Man of Tomorrow made his debut as the lead feature in Action Comics #1.
 
This colorful new brand of hero was an alien in human form that had fallen to Earth as a child. He was stunningly handsome, endowed with supernatural powers, and fought for Truth, Justice and the American Way. His only weakness was the mysterious green mineral known as kryptonite.
 
Like any superhero, Superman needed an alter ego. So, when he was not fighting crime, he was known as Clark Kent, the mild-mannered reporter for the Daily Planet. Soon, Clark developed an interest in another reporter, Lois Lane. Lois, however, was in love with Superman. Superman, in turn, was so involved in crime fighting that he never returned her advances. Superman has been a popular American hero for more than 60 years.