#3186c – 1999 33c Jackie Robinson

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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U.S. #3186c
33¢ Jackie Robinson
Celebrate the Century – 1940s


Issue Date: February 18, 1999
City: Dobbins AFB, GA
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Grandson of a slave, Jack Roosevelt Robinson (1919-1972) was the first African-American to play modern major league baseball. Proud of his talents and his race, he was a star on and off the ball field. 
 
Born in Cairo, Georgia, Robinson starred in four sports at the University of California at Los Angeles. In 1945, he played for the Kansas City Monarchs in the Negro-American League. History was made in 1945, when Robinson signed a contract with the Montreal Royals, the Brooklyn Dodgers’ best farm team. His debut with the Royals on April 18, 1946, is legendary. In five at-bats, he hit a three-run homer and three singles, stole two bases, and scored four times. Jackie was promoted to the Dodgers the following spring. In 1947, he was named Rookie of the Year. In 1949, he won the National League’s Most Valuable Player award.
 
During his career, Robinson was insulted, sent hate mail, intentionally hit by pitches, and issued death threats. Following his example, many African-Americans rejected their “separate but equal” status, and fought for integration. His dignified courage against fierce prejudice was admired by people of all races. In 1962, Jackie Robinson was the first black player inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
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U.S. #3186c
33¢ Jackie Robinson
Celebrate the Century – 1940s


Issue Date: February 18, 1999
City: Dobbins AFB, GA
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Grandson of a slave, Jack Roosevelt Robinson (1919-1972) was the first African-American to play modern major league baseball. Proud of his talents and his race, he was a star on and off the ball field. 
 
Born in Cairo, Georgia, Robinson starred in four sports at the University of California at Los Angeles. In 1945, he played for the Kansas City Monarchs in the Negro-American League. History was made in 1945, when Robinson signed a contract with the Montreal Royals, the Brooklyn Dodgers’ best farm team. His debut with the Royals on April 18, 1946, is legendary. In five at-bats, he hit a three-run homer and three singles, stole two bases, and scored four times. Jackie was promoted to the Dodgers the following spring. In 1947, he was named Rookie of the Year. In 1949, he won the National League’s Most Valuable Player award.
 
During his career, Robinson was insulted, sent hate mail, intentionally hit by pitches, and issued death threats. Following his example, many African-Americans rejected their “separate but equal” status, and fought for integration. His dignified courage against fierce prejudice was admired by people of all races. In 1962, Jackie Robinson was the first black player inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.