#3186o – 1999 33c Orsen Welles' Citizen Kane 1941

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Grading Guide

U.S. #3186o
33¢ Orson Welles’
Citizen Kane
Celebrate the Century – 1940s

Issue Date: February 18, 1999
City: Dobbins AFB, GA
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Regarded as one of the most influential films ever created in the United States, “Citizen Kane” was Orson Welles’ first film. His dramatic use of lighting and music, as well as innovative narrative techniques, established him as a master filmmaker.
 
Welles wrote, directed, produced, and starred in “Citizen Kane.” The movie tells the story of a powerful newspaper magnate, based on the lives of publisher William Randolph Hearst and his mistress Marion Davies. Hearst’s failed attempts to block the film’s release in 1941 made his connection with the story even more obvious to critics and movie-goers.
 
The opening scene of “Citizen Kane” shows Xanadu, Charles Foster Kane’s immense estate, blanketed in fog. Looming above the mist, atop a man-made mountain, sits a castle with a single light shining from a window. Inside lies the dying Kane, clutching a crystal globe enclosing a winter scene. He utters one word, “Rosebud,” then dies. It is then up to a reporter to find out who the real Kane was, and the significance of “Rosebud.”
 
Featured on the 1999 U.S. postage stamp honoring “Citizen Kane” is a photograph from the film. It shows Kane campaigning for governor of New York in front of an enormous promotional poster of himself.
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U.S. #3186o
33¢ Orson Welles’
Citizen Kane
Celebrate the Century – 1940s

Issue Date: February 18, 1999
City: Dobbins AFB, GA
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Regarded as one of the most influential films ever created in the United States, “Citizen Kane” was Orson Welles’ first film. His dramatic use of lighting and music, as well as innovative narrative techniques, established him as a master filmmaker.
 
Welles wrote, directed, produced, and starred in “Citizen Kane.” The movie tells the story of a powerful newspaper magnate, based on the lives of publisher William Randolph Hearst and his mistress Marion Davies. Hearst’s failed attempts to block the film’s release in 1941 made his connection with the story even more obvious to critics and movie-goers.
 
The opening scene of “Citizen Kane” shows Xanadu, Charles Foster Kane’s immense estate, blanketed in fog. Looming above the mist, atop a man-made mountain, sits a castle with a single light shining from a window. Inside lies the dying Kane, clutching a crystal globe enclosing a winter scene. He utters one word, “Rosebud,” then dies. It is then up to a reporter to find out who the real Kane was, and the significance of “Rosebud.”
 
Featured on the 1999 U.S. postage stamp honoring “Citizen Kane” is a photograph from the film. It shows Kane campaigning for governor of New York in front of an enormous promotional poster of himself.