#3187a – 1999 33c Victory Over Polio

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.95
3 More - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
camera Mystic First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. iFREE with 590 points!
$2.95
camera Classic First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.25
camera Fleetwood First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.20
Grading Guide

Description:

U.S. #3187a
33¢ Polio Vaccine Developed
Celebrate the Century – 1950s

Issue Date: May 26, 1999
City: Springfield, MA
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Severe poliomyelitis epidemics have been reported all over the world. In the United States, the number of polio victims was at its highest from 1942 to 1953. During this time, epidemics also occurred in Denmark, Germany, Belgium, and several Asian countries.
 
In 1947, U.S. physician Jonas Salk began research on the polio virus at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. After discovering there were three strains of the virus, he worked to develop a vaccine which would kill each one. He conducted his first field tests in 1952, first on children who had recovered from polio, and later on those who had never had the disease. Both tests were successful, and his findings were published the next year in the Journal of the American Medical Association. In 1954, tests were done on an even larger scale. The vaccine, injected with a needle, was found to reduce the incidence of polio. The vaccine was released for use in the U.S. on April 12, 1955.
 
Dr. Albert Sabin also contributed to the victory over polio. He discovered that live, weakened virus, administered orally, would provide immunity over a longer period of time than killed, injected virus. After extensive research and testing, the oral polio vaccine was approved for use in the U.S. in 1961.
Read More - Click Here

  • Get Mystic's exclusive Historic Postage Stamps of the United States album U.S. Stamp Starter Kit – #M11986

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps – #M8104 3-Volume American Heirloom Album – #M8104

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $45.95
    BUY NOW
  • Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album – #M11954

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3187a
33¢ Polio Vaccine Developed
Celebrate the Century – 1950s

Issue Date: May 26, 1999
City: Springfield, MA
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Severe poliomyelitis epidemics have been reported all over the world. In the United States, the number of polio victims was at its highest from 1942 to 1953. During this time, epidemics also occurred in Denmark, Germany, Belgium, and several Asian countries.
 
In 1947, U.S. physician Jonas Salk began research on the polio virus at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. After discovering there were three strains of the virus, he worked to develop a vaccine which would kill each one. He conducted his first field tests in 1952, first on children who had recovered from polio, and later on those who had never had the disease. Both tests were successful, and his findings were published the next year in the Journal of the American Medical Association. In 1954, tests were done on an even larger scale. The vaccine, injected with a needle, was found to reduce the incidence of polio. The vaccine was released for use in the U.S. on April 12, 1955.
 
Dr. Albert Sabin also contributed to the victory over polio. He discovered that live, weakened virus, administered orally, would provide immunity over a longer period of time than killed, injected virus. After extensive research and testing, the oral polio vaccine was approved for use in the U.S. in 1961.