#3187b – 1999 33c Celebrate the Century - 1950s: Teen Fashion

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.95
$1.95
3 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM641215x38mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM214238x38mm 15 Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$1.50
$1.50
U.S. #3187b
33¢ Teen Fashions
Celebrate the Century – 1950s

Issue Date: May 26, 1999
City: Springfield, MA
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Styles in dress and physical appearance often reflect cultural trends in the United States. During the Depression years, the look was one of maturity. Women wore full, heavy dresses with long skirts. The postwar era, however, focused on the glorification of youth.
 
Fashions of the 1950s ranged from the tube dress, which was made of a single piece of clingy knit fabric, to the sack dress. Teenage girls wore skirts with multiple crinolines underneath to provide extra fullness, called the “bouffant” look. Skirt lengths hung at mid-calf, but shorts, with rolled-up cuffs, got shorter. Teenagers wore stick-on pins and pop-it necklaces, whose length could be changed by the wearer snapping on or off an extra set of beads. Saddle shoes were also popular.
 
The curly “poodle” hair style was the rage among women, and many young men wore ducktail hairdos. Pink became a popular color for men’s shirts, ties, and hatbands. Business executives wore fewer gray suits and more Bermuda shorts. Some teen-age boys sported string “Colonel” ties and pleated “rogue” pants.
 
Hollywood stars helped define fashions of the decade, including Marilyn Monroe. With her suggestive demeanor and childlike innocence, she was one of the era’s most significant beauty icons.
Read More - Click Here


  • 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Winter Scenes 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Winter Scenes

    In 2020, the United States Postal Service issued a set of 10 new Forever stamps picturing winter scenes.  Add these popular stamps to your collection now!

    $8.50- $64.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1980s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 100 First Day Covers Issued During the 1980s
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers honored the 1980 Winter Olympics, paid tribute to the service of American veterans,  and recalled some of the United States’ most well-known first ladies (like Abigail Adams and Eleanor Roosevelt).  There was even a cover issued for the World Stamp Expo of 1989.  Order your set today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • U.S. Used Stamp Collection - 157 stamps U.S. Used Collection of 157 stamps

    You'll receive postally used stamps issued from 1890 to 2010 – that's 120 years of history to explore!  This collection includes definitive, commemorative, and Airmail stamps, plus a few other surprises.  You'll have a great time exploring the stamps and adding them to your collection.  Order today.

    $4.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3187b
33¢ Teen Fashions
Celebrate the Century – 1950s

Issue Date: May 26, 1999
City: Springfield, MA
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Styles in dress and physical appearance often reflect cultural trends in the United States. During the Depression years, the look was one of maturity. Women wore full, heavy dresses with long skirts. The postwar era, however, focused on the glorification of youth.
 
Fashions of the 1950s ranged from the tube dress, which was made of a single piece of clingy knit fabric, to the sack dress. Teenage girls wore skirts with multiple crinolines underneath to provide extra fullness, called the “bouffant” look. Skirt lengths hung at mid-calf, but shorts, with rolled-up cuffs, got shorter. Teenagers wore stick-on pins and pop-it necklaces, whose length could be changed by the wearer snapping on or off an extra set of beads. Saddle shoes were also popular.
 
The curly “poodle” hair style was the rage among women, and many young men wore ducktail hairdos. Pink became a popular color for men’s shirts, ties, and hatbands. Business executives wore fewer gray suits and more Bermuda shorts. Some teen-age boys sported string “Colonel” ties and pleated “rogue” pants.
 
Hollywood stars helped define fashions of the decade, including Marilyn Monroe. With her suggestive demeanor and childlike innocence, she was one of the era’s most significant beauty icons.