#3191c – 2000 33c Celebrate the Century - 1990s: "Seinfeld"

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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U.S. #3191c
2000 33¢ Sitcom Sensation
Celebrate the Century

Issue Date: May 2, 2000
City: Monterey, CA
Quantity: 8,250,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 ½
Color: Multicolored
 
 “Seinfeld” may be the television show that defined the 1990s. It appealed to such a huge number of Americans because it pursued the same trivial problems they face each day, like changing barbers and losing your car in a parking garage. Just like many other hit sitcoms, it took a few seasons for the offbeat show to take off.
 
The show that began as the “Seinfeld Chronicles” revolves around a character much like the real Jerry Seinfeld. Seinfeld and co-creator Larry David met in the 1970s at the comedy clubs of New York City. The sitcom they developed is about four intelligent people – Jerry, Elaine, George, and Kramer, who spend their time in unintelligent ways. David’s slogan for the show was “no learning, no hugging.” Just comedic stories of self-absorbed people who live in New York City.
 
The pilot, which aired in the summer of 1989, flopped. Retooled episodes, then called “Seinfeld,” aired in May and June of 1990. But it wasn’t until 1993, when the show was moved to Thursday nights after “Cheers,” that viewers began to really take notice.
 
After nine years on television, the last episode of “Seinfeld” aired May 14, 1998. Plans for this episode were top secret, and those who were present for the taping were sworn to secrecy.
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U.S. #3191c
2000 33¢ Sitcom Sensation
Celebrate the Century

Issue Date: May 2, 2000
City: Monterey, CA
Quantity: 8,250,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 ½
Color: Multicolored
 
 “Seinfeld” may be the television show that defined the 1990s. It appealed to such a huge number of Americans because it pursued the same trivial problems they face each day, like changing barbers and losing your car in a parking garage. Just like many other hit sitcoms, it took a few seasons for the offbeat show to take off.
 
The show that began as the “Seinfeld Chronicles” revolves around a character much like the real Jerry Seinfeld. Seinfeld and co-creator Larry David met in the 1970s at the comedy clubs of New York City. The sitcom they developed is about four intelligent people – Jerry, Elaine, George, and Kramer, who spend their time in unintelligent ways. David’s slogan for the show was “no learning, no hugging.” Just comedic stories of self-absorbed people who live in New York City.
 
The pilot, which aired in the summer of 1989, flopped. Retooled episodes, then called “Seinfeld,” aired in May and June of 1990. But it wasn’t until 1993, when the show was moved to Thursday nights after “Cheers,” that viewers began to really take notice.
 
After nine years on television, the last episode of “Seinfeld” aired May 14, 1998. Plans for this episode were top secret, and those who were present for the taping were sworn to secrecy.