#3191l – 2000 33c Celebrate the Century - 1990s: "Titanic"

U.S. #3191l
2000 33¢ Blockbuster Film
Celebrate the Century – 1990s

Issue Date: May 2, 2000
City: Monterey, CA
Quantity: 8,250,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 ½
Color: Multicolored
 
The thrilling action, astonishing special effects, and romantic story of “Titanic” combined to make this film one of the most spectacular in history. It made $1.8 billion worldwide, earned a record-tying 11 Academy Awards, and sold 50 million copies on home video. “Titanic” was so popular that many moviegoers went to the theater to see it two or more times.
 
“Titanic” opened in the U.S. on December 19, 1997. The story of the 17-year-old American aristocrat (Rose) who falls in love with a destitute free spirit (Jack) captivated audiences. Director James Cameron wanted to keep all the details related to the sinking of the Titanic true while telling the fictional love story.
 
The film also broke records as the most expensive ever made to date. Initial projections said “Titanic” would cost $110 million. The escalating costs led Cameron to sacrifice his paycheck to get the over $200 million film made as he had envisioned it.
 
A special 40-acre studio was built in Rosarita Beach, Mexico, for the filming of “Titanic.” A 780-foot replica of the ship was built there. In an effort to keep the story as historically accurate as possible, custom-made lighting fixtures, furniture, china, and other items were created – and later destroyed – when the ship “sank.”
Read More - Click Here


  • Imperforate Stamp Club Introductory Offer - 2015 49c A Charlie Brown Christmas Join Mystic's Imperforate Stamp Club and Save 30%

    Collect some of the scarcest US stamps issued in the last decade.  From 2012 to 2016, the USPS issued extremely limited quantities of imperforate stamps (as few as 10,000 in some cases).  On sale for just four years, it can be difficult to find them anywhere today.

    $18.95
    BUY NOW
  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • US Stamp Starter Kit U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3191l
2000 33¢ Blockbuster Film
Celebrate the Century – 1990s

Issue Date: May 2, 2000
City: Monterey, CA
Quantity: 8,250,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 ½
Color: Multicolored
 
The thrilling action, astonishing special effects, and romantic story of “Titanic” combined to make this film one of the most spectacular in history. It made $1.8 billion worldwide, earned a record-tying 11 Academy Awards, and sold 50 million copies on home video. “Titanic” was so popular that many moviegoers went to the theater to see it two or more times.
 
“Titanic” opened in the U.S. on December 19, 1997. The story of the 17-year-old American aristocrat (Rose) who falls in love with a destitute free spirit (Jack) captivated audiences. Director James Cameron wanted to keep all the details related to the sinking of the Titanic true while telling the fictional love story.
 
The film also broke records as the most expensive ever made to date. Initial projections said “Titanic” would cost $110 million. The escalating costs led Cameron to sacrifice his paycheck to get the over $200 million film made as he had envisioned it.
 
A special 40-acre studio was built in Rosarita Beach, Mexico, for the filming of “Titanic.” A 780-foot replica of the ship was built there. In an effort to keep the story as historically accurate as possible, custom-made lighting fixtures, furniture, china, and other items were created – and later destroyed – when the ship “sank.”