#3225 – 1998 32c Cardinal Honeyeater Tropical Bird

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.60
$1.60
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.90
$0.90
4 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50145x30mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
U.S. #3222
1998 32¢ Cardinal Honeyeater
Tropical Birds
 
Issue Date: July 29, 1998
City: Ponce, Puerto Rico
Quantity: 17,500,000
Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.2
Color: Multicolored
 
This issue is part of a four-stamp se-tenant featuring tropical birds that are native to the islands belonging to the United States. The Antillean Euphonia resides in the thick mountain forests of Puerto Rico. The Green-throated Carib is also found in Puerto Rico, but along the northeast coast. The Crested Honeycreeper is an endangered species from the rain forests of Maui, and the Cardinal Honeyeater lives on the South Pacific island of Samoa.
 
A member of about 170 species of birds within the songbird family Meliphagidae, the cardinal honeyeater once made its home in Guam. Now extinct on that island, the bird can be found in American Samoa in the South Pacific Ocean. Other species of the family are found in Australia, New Guinea, Hawaii, and South Africa.
 
With its long, tube-shaped tongue sporting brush-like edges, the honeyeater is able to extract nectar from flowers. The bird got its name from its habit of drinking nectar from the blossoms of trees and shrubs. It also eats berries, fruits, caterpillars, spiders, and other insects.
 
Most honeyeaters are greenish or grayish-brown with white or yellow marks on their heads. They range in size from three to 20 inches long. Only a few species of honeyeaters can sing well, with most making harsh, unpleasant sounds.
 
Honeyeaters have become nearly extinct in the Hawaiian islands. That is because when American and English people settled there, the animals they brought with them killed the birds. The destruction of forests has also contributed to the low number of honeyeaters there. Of the five species that once lived in Hawaii, only one species, the Kauai oo, was known to have survived.
Read More - Click Here


  • 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Winter Scenes 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Winter Scenes

    In 2020, the United States Postal Service issued a set of 10 new Forever stamps picturing winter scenes.  Add these popular stamps to your collection now!

    $8.50- $64.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1980s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 100 First Day Covers Issued During the 1980s
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers honored the 1980 Winter Olympics, paid tribute to the service of American veterans,  and recalled some of the United States’ most well-known first ladies (like Abigail Adams and Eleanor Roosevelt).  There was even a cover issued for the World Stamp Expo of 1989.  Order your set today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • U.S. Used Stamp Collection - 157 stamps U.S. Used Collection of 157 stamps

    You'll receive postally used stamps issued from 1890 to 2010 – that's 120 years of history to explore!  This collection includes definitive, commemorative, and Airmail stamps, plus a few other surprises.  You'll have a great time exploring the stamps and adding them to your collection.  Order today.

    $4.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3222
1998 32¢ Cardinal Honeyeater
Tropical Birds
 
Issue Date: July 29, 1998
City: Ponce, Puerto Rico
Quantity: 17,500,000
Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.2
Color: Multicolored
 
This issue is part of a four-stamp se-tenant featuring tropical birds that are native to the islands belonging to the United States. The Antillean Euphonia resides in the thick mountain forests of Puerto Rico. The Green-throated Carib is also found in Puerto Rico, but along the northeast coast. The Crested Honeycreeper is an endangered species from the rain forests of Maui, and the Cardinal Honeyeater lives on the South Pacific island of Samoa.
 
A member of about 170 species of birds within the songbird family Meliphagidae, the cardinal honeyeater once made its home in Guam. Now extinct on that island, the bird can be found in American Samoa in the South Pacific Ocean. Other species of the family are found in Australia, New Guinea, Hawaii, and South Africa.
 
With its long, tube-shaped tongue sporting brush-like edges, the honeyeater is able to extract nectar from flowers. The bird got its name from its habit of drinking nectar from the blossoms of trees and shrubs. It also eats berries, fruits, caterpillars, spiders, and other insects.
 
Most honeyeaters are greenish or grayish-brown with white or yellow marks on their heads. They range in size from three to 20 inches long. Only a few species of honeyeaters can sing well, with most making harsh, unpleasant sounds.
 
Honeyeaters have become nearly extinct in the Hawaiian islands. That is because when American and English people settled there, the animals they brought with them killed the birds. The destruction of forests has also contributed to the low number of honeyeaters there. Of the five species that once lived in Hawaii, only one species, the Kauai oo, was known to have survived.