#3228 – 1998 10c Modern Bicycle, self-adhesive coil

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- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.40
$0.40
- Used Single Stamp(s)
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$0.25
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- MM639215x35mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
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$7.95
$7.95
- MM50730x34mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
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$3.50
$3.50
- MM420430x34mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
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$3.50
$3.50
U.S. #3228
10¢ Bicycle
Transportation Series Coil

Issue Date: August 14, 1998
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 1,110,000,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
Serpentine die cut 9.8 vertically
Color: Multicolored
 
In 1998, a second stamp was added to the American Transportation Series. The ten-cent Green Bicycle was issued to replace the Automobile bulk-rate stamp. In keeping with the design of the series, only a detail of the bicycle, the handlebar area, is shown on the stamp. The new Postal Service term "PRESORTED STD" appears here for the first time on a U.S. postage stamp.
 
America’s First Bicycle Manufacturer
Albert Augustus Pope (1843-1909) established the first U.S. bicycle factory in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1877. Early models carried the trade name “Columbia.” The firm grew steadily and produced an average of 60,000 bicycles annually during the 1880s. Pope was a pioneer and advocate of the hobby who successfully lobbied Congress for bicycle safety legislation. In 1895, Pope purchased 75 competitors and merged them to form the American Bicycle Company. The Pope Manufacturing Company is known as Columbia Bicycle today.
 
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U.S. #3228
10¢ Bicycle
Transportation Series Coil

Issue Date: August 14, 1998
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 1,110,000,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
Serpentine die cut 9.8 vertically
Color: Multicolored
 
In 1998, a second stamp was added to the American Transportation Series. The ten-cent Green Bicycle was issued to replace the Automobile bulk-rate stamp. In keeping with the design of the series, only a detail of the bicycle, the handlebar area, is shown on the stamp. The new Postal Service term "PRESORTED STD" appears here for the first time on a U.S. postage stamp.
 
America’s First Bicycle Manufacturer
Albert Augustus Pope (1843-1909) established the first U.S. bicycle factory in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1877. Early models carried the trade name “Columbia.” The firm grew steadily and produced an average of 60,000 bicycles annually during the 1880s. Pope was a pioneer and advocate of the hobby who successfully lobbied Congress for bicycle safety legislation. In 1895, Pope purchased 75 competitors and merged them to form the American Bicycle Company. The Pope Manufacturing Company is known as Columbia Bicycle today.