#3236p – 1998 32c Four Centuries of American Art: Edward Hopper

U.S. #3236p
32¢ Edwin Hopper
Four Centuries of American Art
 
Issue Date: August 27, 1998
City: Santa Clara, CA
Quantity: 4,000,000
Printed By: Sennett Security Products
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations:
10.2
Color: Multicolored
 
The paintings by Edward Hopper (1882-1967) depict realistic scenes of American life. His candid works often feature city streets, restaurants, movie theaters, storefronts, and homes as their subjects. Although the paintings appear to be straightforward scenes, most attempt to convey isolation and seclusion.
 
Often people who have never seen a Hopper work are familiar with his style because his paintings had a significant impact on American pop culture. The characteristics of the Victorian-style houses with big, staring windows featured in many of his works were often recreated. On television, the home that the Addams family lived in was a Hopper house. So was the house from Alfred Hitchcock’s movie Psycho.
 
Hopper suffered from feelings of loneliness and solitude, which crept into the work he produced. These emotions are apparent in one of his most famous paintings, Nighthawks (1942). A man of extreme plainness and inhibitions, Hopper had no interest in communicating with the outside world except by means of his art. 
 
Hopper also used his wife, Jo Nivinson, as a model for many of his paintings. Her image is featured in High Noon (1949) and A Woman in the Sun (1961).
Read More - Click Here


U.S. #3236p
32¢ Edwin Hopper
Four Centuries of American Art
 
Issue Date: August 27, 1998
City: Santa Clara, CA
Quantity: 4,000,000
Printed By: Sennett Security Products
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations:
10.2
Color: Multicolored
 
The paintings by Edward Hopper (1882-1967) depict realistic scenes of American life. His candid works often feature city streets, restaurants, movie theaters, storefronts, and homes as their subjects. Although the paintings appear to be straightforward scenes, most attempt to convey isolation and seclusion.
 
Often people who have never seen a Hopper work are familiar with his style because his paintings had a significant impact on American pop culture. The characteristics of the Victorian-style houses with big, staring windows featured in many of his works were often recreated. On television, the home that the Addams family lived in was a Hopper house. So was the house from Alfred Hitchcock’s movie Psycho.
 
Hopper suffered from feelings of loneliness and solitude, which crept into the work he produced. These emotions are apparent in one of his most famous paintings, Nighthawks (1942). A man of extreme plainness and inhibitions, Hopper had no interest in communicating with the outside world except by means of his art. 
 
Hopper also used his wife, Jo Nivinson, as a model for many of his paintings. Her image is featured in High Noon (1949) and A Woman in the Sun (1961).