#330 – 1907 5c Pocahontas, blue

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$185.00
$185.00
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$39.00
$39.00
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$105.00
$105.00
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$25.00FREE with 6,180 points!
$25.00
5 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM69850 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 35 x 28 millimeters (1-1/8 x 1-3/8 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.95
$2.95
 
U.S. #330
1907 5¢ Pocahontas
Jamestown Commemorative

Issue Date: May 3, 1907
Quantity issued:
 7,980,594
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Method: Flat plate
Watermark: Double line USPS
Perforation: 12
Color: Blue
 
Jamestown was the first permanent English settlement in America and was founded on May 14, 1607. It was there that the first representative government of the American continent was established. The cultivation of tobacco was begun there. Jamestown is also remembered for buying the first Negro slaves to be introduced into the 13 colonies.
 
The 1907 Jamestown commemorative stamp set honors the 300th anniversary of the settlement’s founding, which was a historic chapter in our nation’s development. Captain John Smith and Pocahontas, two prominent figures in the event, are also honored in the set. 
 
Plans for the series changed a few times, from a set of 10 stamps commemorating several key people in the founding of Jamestown to only two stamps, which would not include Pocahontas.  The daughter of the Indian Chief Powhatan, Pocahontas is the heroine of one of the best- known traditions connected with American history. When John Smith was sentenced to death, he was but seconds away from having his brains crushed with heavy clubs. Pocahontas ran to his aid and begged and pleaded with her father not to kill him. Smith was spared his life.
 
Historical societies petitioned for her inclusion, and she was ultimately pictured on the 5¢ denomination. The decision was wise, as the 5¢ stamp paid the international rate for foreign visitors wishing to send letters home, and was needed to make a complete series.
 
John Smith is pictured on the 1¢ Jamestown commemorative stamp. Smith is the best known of the early settlers of Virginia. As a youngster, he was an indifferent student and eventually chose to follow the call of the sea. At the young age of 26, he began trying to colonize Jamestown. While on an expedition in Virginia, he and his men were attacked by Indians. Smith was tried and sentenced to die, but was supposedly saved by Pocahontas. While many of the events in Smith’s life have been debated, he’s credited with making an accurate map of the northeastern coast from Penobscot, Maine, to Cape Cod. And it was Smith who called the area “New England.”
 
 
Read More - Click Here


  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2018 50¢ The Art of Magic souvenir sheet Get The 2018 ‘Art Of Magic’ Souvenir Sheet with Special Animation Effect

    Own a mint souvenir sheet of three Art of Magic stamps featuring a white rabbit seeming to appear and disappear out of a black top hat.  The special animation effect was created using lenticular printing and makes this souvenir sheet a fun addition to your collection.  Get yours now.

    $3.95- $6.95
    BUY NOW
  • US Stamp Starter Kit Give Your Grandchildren the Gift of Stamp Collecting

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW

 
U.S. #330
1907 5¢ Pocahontas
Jamestown Commemorative

Issue Date: May 3, 1907
Quantity issued:
 7,980,594
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Method: Flat plate
Watermark: Double line USPS
Perforation: 12
Color: Blue
 
Jamestown was the first permanent English settlement in America and was founded on May 14, 1607. It was there that the first representative government of the American continent was established. The cultivation of tobacco was begun there. Jamestown is also remembered for buying the first Negro slaves to be introduced into the 13 colonies.
 
The 1907 Jamestown commemorative stamp set honors the 300th anniversary of the settlement’s founding, which was a historic chapter in our nation’s development. Captain John Smith and Pocahontas, two prominent figures in the event, are also honored in the set. 
 
Plans for the series changed a few times, from a set of 10 stamps commemorating several key people in the founding of Jamestown to only two stamps, which would not include Pocahontas.  The daughter of the Indian Chief Powhatan, Pocahontas is the heroine of one of the best- known traditions connected with American history. When John Smith was sentenced to death, he was but seconds away from having his brains crushed with heavy clubs. Pocahontas ran to his aid and begged and pleaded with her father not to kill him. Smith was spared his life.
 
Historical societies petitioned for her inclusion, and she was ultimately pictured on the 5¢ denomination. The decision was wise, as the 5¢ stamp paid the international rate for foreign visitors wishing to send letters home, and was needed to make a complete series.
 
John Smith is pictured on the 1¢ Jamestown commemorative stamp. Smith is the best known of the early settlers of Virginia. As a youngster, he was an indifferent student and eventually chose to follow the call of the sea. At the young age of 26, he began trying to colonize Jamestown. While on an expedition in Virginia, he and his men were attacked by Indians. Smith was tried and sentenced to die, but was supposedly saved by Pocahontas. While many of the events in Smith’s life have been debated, he’s credited with making an accurate map of the northeastern coast from Penobscot, Maine, to Cape Cod. And it was Smith who called the area “New England.”