#3408s – 2000 33c Legends of Baseball: Dizzy Dean

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U.S. #3408s
33¢ Dizzy Dean
Legends of Baseball
 
Issue Date: July 6, 2000
City: Atlanta, GA
Quantity:
 11,250,000
Printed by: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine die cut 11.25
Color: Multicolored
 
Jay Hanna “Dizzy” Dean (1910-1974) is not only a legend in the sport of baseball, but in American culture. A native of Arkansas, the “Great One” attended school through the fourth grade. He learned the fundamentals of pitching while serving with the United States Army.
 
In 1932, Dean entered the major leagues. During his rookie year with the St. Louis Cardinals, he led the National League with 191 strikeouts. On July 30, 1933, he tallied a record 17 strikeouts in one game.
 
Dean was known for his colorful personality. Prior to a game with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1934, he entered the opposing team’s clubhouse and informed each player of the pitches he planned to throw them. He pitched the Cardinals to a 13-0 victory that day.
 
Dean’s best season was 1934, when his 30 wins and 195 strikeouts made him the National League’s Most Valuable Player. An injury in 1937 strained his arm, and it was never the same. He was traded to the Chicago Cubs in 1938, and pitched in the World Series that year.
 
In 1941, after his baseball career ended, Dean traded his bat for a microphone. His folksy style made him a popular baseball commentator, and he was known for using words like “slud” instead of slid and “throwed” for threw. Dean was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1953.
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U.S. #3408s
33¢ Dizzy Dean
Legends of Baseball
 
Issue Date: July 6, 2000
City: Atlanta, GA
Quantity:
 11,250,000
Printed by: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine die cut 11.25
Color: Multicolored
 
Jay Hanna “Dizzy” Dean (1910-1974) is not only a legend in the sport of baseball, but in American culture. A native of Arkansas, the “Great One” attended school through the fourth grade. He learned the fundamentals of pitching while serving with the United States Army.
 
In 1932, Dean entered the major leagues. During his rookie year with the St. Louis Cardinals, he led the National League with 191 strikeouts. On July 30, 1933, he tallied a record 17 strikeouts in one game.
 
Dean was known for his colorful personality. Prior to a game with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1934, he entered the opposing team’s clubhouse and informed each player of the pitches he planned to throw them. He pitched the Cardinals to a 13-0 victory that day.
 
Dean’s best season was 1934, when his 30 wins and 195 strikeouts made him the National League’s Most Valuable Player. An injury in 1937 strained his arm, and it was never the same. He was traded to the Chicago Cubs in 1938, and pitched in the World Series that year.
 
In 1941, after his baseball career ended, Dean traded his bat for a microphone. His folksy style made him a popular baseball commentator, and he was known for using words like “slud” instead of slid and “throwed” for threw. Dean was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1953.