#3909 – 2005 37c American Scientist: Richard Feynman

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U.S. #3909
37¢ Richard Feynman
American Scientists
 
Issue Date: May 4, 2005
City: New Haven, CT
Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America for Sennett Security Products
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75
Quantity: 50,000,000
Color: Multicolored
 
Richard Phillips Feynman
Theoretical physicist Richard Phillips Feynman (1918-1988) was raised in Far Rockaway, New York. As a boy, he collected electric gadgets and repaired radios. He attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and earned a Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University.
 
During World War II, Feynman worked on the atomic bomb at the Manhattan Project, in Los Alamos, NM. To amuse himself and to point out deficiencies in security, he opened his colleagues’ safes and left notes in them.
 
After the war, Feynman taught at Cornell University and then at the California Institute of Technology. He was an enthusiastic educator who sought to make topics understandable to others.
 
Feynman shared the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physics. His work on quantum electrodynamics described the interactions of charged, subatomic particles and electromagnetic fields. He invented “Feynman diagrams,” arrows and squiggles that show particle activity.
 
In 1986, Feynman served on the special commission investigating the explosion of the Challenger space shuttle. He discovered that an O-ring seal had failed due to the unusually cold launch-pad temperatures.
 
Scientist Richard Feynman is remembered for his gentle wit, insatiable curiosity, and brilliant mind.
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U.S. #3909
37¢ Richard Feynman
American Scientists
 
Issue Date: May 4, 2005
City: New Haven, CT
Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America for Sennett Security Products
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75
Quantity: 50,000,000
Color: Multicolored
 
Richard Phillips Feynman
Theoretical physicist Richard Phillips Feynman (1918-1988) was raised in Far Rockaway, New York. As a boy, he collected electric gadgets and repaired radios. He attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and earned a Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University.
 
During World War II, Feynman worked on the atomic bomb at the Manhattan Project, in Los Alamos, NM. To amuse himself and to point out deficiencies in security, he opened his colleagues’ safes and left notes in them.
 
After the war, Feynman taught at Cornell University and then at the California Institute of Technology. He was an enthusiastic educator who sought to make topics understandable to others.
 
Feynman shared the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physics. His work on quantum electrodynamics described the interactions of charged, subatomic particles and electromagnetic fields. He invented “Feynman diagrams,” arrows and squiggles that show particle activity.
 
In 1986, Feynman served on the special commission investigating the explosion of the Challenger space shuttle. He discovered that an O-ring seal had failed due to the unusually cold launch-pad temperatures.
 
Scientist Richard Feynman is remembered for his gentle wit, insatiable curiosity, and brilliant mind.