#3917 – 2005 37c Advances in Aviation: Consolidated PBY Catalina

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.50
$1.50
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.80
$0.80
3 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM641215x38mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.75
$7.75
- MM68645x38mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$5.75
$5.75
U.S. #3917
37¢ PBY Catalina
American Advances in Aviation
 
Issue Date: July 29, 2005
City: Oshkosh, WI
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75 x 10.5
Quantity: 110,000,000
Color: Multicolored
 
Consolidated Aircraft introduced the PBY Catalina, a durable, long-range flying-boat, in 1936. About 4,000 Catalinas, more than any other floatplane, were built for the U.S. Navy and U.S. allies between 1936 and 1945.
 
Consolidated continually improved the PBY. They put transparent domes on the waist-gun positions for better viewing. Retractable, tricycle landing gear was added to make the plane amphibian. Other upgrades included optical bomb- and gun-sights and radar.
 
During World War II, a “Black Cat Squadron” of black-painted Cats flew night bombing missions against Japanese shipping in the Pacific. Equipped with radar and radio altimeters, they skimmed the dark surface of the ocean. Their large size, an easy target in daylight, enabled them to carry great quantities of weapons and sufficient fuel to fly deep into enemy-controlled territory. PBY Catalinas seriously disrupted the flow of Japanese military supplies and personnel to island bases.
 
By day, Black Cats flew perilous rescue missions, picking up air crews shot down in the sea. The code name for these operations was “Dumbo,” for the big-eared, flying elephant of the Disney feature film. After the war, PBY Catalinas continued to serve as search-and-rescue planes in several countries for many more years.
Read More - Click Here


  • 2019 First-Class Forever Stamp - First Moon Landing NEW 2019 Moon Landing Stamps

    Commemorates the 50th anniversary of man’s first footstep on the moon’s surface by Neil Armstrong, Commander of the Apollo 11 mission.  First-ever US stamps to be printed on chrome paper!

    $2.25- $235.00
    BUY NOW
  • Mystic Mystery Mix Mystic's Famous Mystery Mix

    Build your collection quickly with this mixture of U.S. stamps, foreign stamps, and stamps on covers.  Hours of fun and excitement guaranteed!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • 2018 Giant US Commemorative Collection, Mint, 132 Stamps 2018 US Commemorative Collection

    Get every 2018 US commemorative issued plus several bonus sheets, souvenir sheets, and panes – all at once in mint condition.

    $120.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3917
37¢ PBY Catalina
American Advances in Aviation
 
Issue Date: July 29, 2005
City: Oshkosh, WI
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75 x 10.5
Quantity: 110,000,000
Color: Multicolored
 
Consolidated Aircraft introduced the PBY Catalina, a durable, long-range flying-boat, in 1936. About 4,000 Catalinas, more than any other floatplane, were built for the U.S. Navy and U.S. allies between 1936 and 1945.
 
Consolidated continually improved the PBY. They put transparent domes on the waist-gun positions for better viewing. Retractable, tricycle landing gear was added to make the plane amphibian. Other upgrades included optical bomb- and gun-sights and radar.
 
During World War II, a “Black Cat Squadron” of black-painted Cats flew night bombing missions against Japanese shipping in the Pacific. Equipped with radar and radio altimeters, they skimmed the dark surface of the ocean. Their large size, an easy target in daylight, enabled them to carry great quantities of weapons and sufficient fuel to fly deep into enemy-controlled territory. PBY Catalinas seriously disrupted the flow of Japanese military supplies and personnel to island bases.
 
By day, Black Cats flew perilous rescue missions, picking up air crews shot down in the sea. The code name for these operations was “Dumbo,” for the big-eared, flying elephant of the Disney feature film. After the war, PBY Catalinas continued to serve as search-and-rescue planes in several countries for many more years.