#3963 – 2005 37c Distinguished Marines: John Basilone

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U.S. #3963
37¢ John Basilone
Distinguished Marines
 
Issue Date: November 10, 2005
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 60,000,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 11 x 10.5
Color: Multicolored
 
John Basilone
Gunnery Sergeant John Basilone (1916-45) was born in Buffalo, New York, and raised in Raritan, New Jersey. At 18, he joined the Army and served three years before being honorably discharged. In 1940, with World War II on the horizon, he joined the Marines.
 
In the 1942 battle of Bloody Ridge on Guadalcanal, Basilone commanded two machine-gun emplacements defending an airfield. When the Japanese attacked and one gun crew was wiped out, Basilone rolled back and forth over the ground, firing first one gun, then the other. When ammunition got low, he went back through enemy fire for more. Basilone saved Henderson Airfield by valiantly holding off an advancing Japanese regiment until reinforcements arrived.
 
Basilone was awarded the Medal of Honor for extraordinary heroism above and beyond the call of duty. He returned home a hero, but refused a commission and asked to return to the Pacific to rejoin his men.
 
When the Marines landed on Iwo Jima on February 19, 1945, Basilone single-handedly destroyed a Japanese blockhouse, allowing his unit to capture an airfield. Minutes later, an enemy shell killed him. On his left arm was a tattoo that read “Death before Dishonor.” Basilone was awarded the Navy Cross posthumously.
 

Victory At Guadalcanal

On February 9, 1943, the Allies claimed a major victory and marked the end of the Guadalcanal Campaign.

The Guadalcanal Campaign, also known as Operation Watchtower, was the Allies’ first major offensive against the Japanese Empire. The campaign began on August 7, 1942, with the Allies’ arrival on the islands of Guadalcanal, Tulagi, and Florida in the southern Solomon Islands. The landing, consisting largely of U.S. forces, was intended to keep the Japanese from using the islands to disturb supply and communication chains between the U.S., Australia, and New Zealand.

Upon their landing, the Allies successfully overwhelmed the Japanese defenders, who’d occupied the islands since May, and captured Tulagi, Florida, and Henderson Field (an airfield). Between August and September 1942, the Japanese made several attempts (three land and seven naval battles) to retake Henderson Field.

One of the first attacks took place during the night of August 9. The Japanese Navy had trained in night fighting, giving them an advantage. Allied aircraft couldn’t fly effectively at night so the planes offered no support during the attack.

The Japanese ships positioned themselves around Savo Island, where the Allied fleet was patrolling. Though a couple U.S. ships spotted them during the approach and sent warnings, the threats were not taken seriously by the Allied commanders.

At about 1:30 a.m. on the 9th, the Japanese commander gave the order, “Every ship attack.” The fleet had been divided into two forces, one moving to the north of the island, the other to the south. Over the next hour, the Japanese fired on American and Australian warships, destroying some and severely damaging others. The Japanese then moved out of range of the remaining Allied vessels to discuss whether or not to continue the battle. Faced with low ammunition and a limited knowledge of the strength of the opponent’s fleet, the commander decided to withdraw.

But the Japanese returned to attack almost daily. Much of the fighting was centered around the airfield. Though the Japanese continued to bomb the runway, the Allied planes were still able to take off and hold back the Japanese ground forces. While the Allies had the advantage on land and in the air, the two battles at sea damaged American aircraft carriers.

Following the decisive Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, the Japanese abandoned their attempts to retake Henderson Field, though fighting would continue for a few more months. In all the campaign lasted a total of six months and two days. During the course of the campaign there were a total of 17 battles, which included Tulagii, Tenaru, Edson’s Ridge, Matanikau, Henderson Field, Mt. Austen, Eastern Solomons, Cape Esperance, and Santa Cruz Island, among others.

The Japanese made their last evacuations in early February, and when the Allied commanders realized this, they declared the Guadalcanal Campaign to be over on February 9, 1943. The Guadalcanal Campaign marked a shift in the war’s dynamic. The Allies transitioned from defensive operations to creating a strategic offensive, leading to the Solomon Islands, New Guinea, and Central Pacific Campaigns. Additionally, the Japanese suffered over 19,000 dead and were unable to replace lost aircraft and ships, placing them at a disadvantage for the remainder of the war.

 
 
 
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U.S. #3963
37¢ John Basilone
Distinguished Marines
 
Issue Date: November 10, 2005
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 60,000,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 11 x 10.5
Color: Multicolored
 
John Basilone
Gunnery Sergeant John Basilone (1916-45) was born in Buffalo, New York, and raised in Raritan, New Jersey. At 18, he joined the Army and served three years before being honorably discharged. In 1940, with World War II on the horizon, he joined the Marines.
 
In the 1942 battle of Bloody Ridge on Guadalcanal, Basilone commanded two machine-gun emplacements defending an airfield. When the Japanese attacked and one gun crew was wiped out, Basilone rolled back and forth over the ground, firing first one gun, then the other. When ammunition got low, he went back through enemy fire for more. Basilone saved Henderson Airfield by valiantly holding off an advancing Japanese regiment until reinforcements arrived.
 
Basilone was awarded the Medal of Honor for extraordinary heroism above and beyond the call of duty. He returned home a hero, but refused a commission and asked to return to the Pacific to rejoin his men.
 
When the Marines landed on Iwo Jima on February 19, 1945, Basilone single-handedly destroyed a Japanese blockhouse, allowing his unit to capture an airfield. Minutes later, an enemy shell killed him. On his left arm was a tattoo that read “Death before Dishonor.” Basilone was awarded the Navy Cross posthumously.
 

Victory At Guadalcanal

On February 9, 1943, the Allies claimed a major victory and marked the end of the Guadalcanal Campaign.

The Guadalcanal Campaign, also known as Operation Watchtower, was the Allies’ first major offensive against the Japanese Empire. The campaign began on August 7, 1942, with the Allies’ arrival on the islands of Guadalcanal, Tulagi, and Florida in the southern Solomon Islands. The landing, consisting largely of U.S. forces, was intended to keep the Japanese from using the islands to disturb supply and communication chains between the U.S., Australia, and New Zealand.

Upon their landing, the Allies successfully overwhelmed the Japanese defenders, who’d occupied the islands since May, and captured Tulagi, Florida, and Henderson Field (an airfield). Between August and September 1942, the Japanese made several attempts (three land and seven naval battles) to retake Henderson Field.

One of the first attacks took place during the night of August 9. The Japanese Navy had trained in night fighting, giving them an advantage. Allied aircraft couldn’t fly effectively at night so the planes offered no support during the attack.

The Japanese ships positioned themselves around Savo Island, where the Allied fleet was patrolling. Though a couple U.S. ships spotted them during the approach and sent warnings, the threats were not taken seriously by the Allied commanders.

At about 1:30 a.m. on the 9th, the Japanese commander gave the order, “Every ship attack.” The fleet had been divided into two forces, one moving to the north of the island, the other to the south. Over the next hour, the Japanese fired on American and Australian warships, destroying some and severely damaging others. The Japanese then moved out of range of the remaining Allied vessels to discuss whether or not to continue the battle. Faced with low ammunition and a limited knowledge of the strength of the opponent’s fleet, the commander decided to withdraw.

But the Japanese returned to attack almost daily. Much of the fighting was centered around the airfield. Though the Japanese continued to bomb the runway, the Allied planes were still able to take off and hold back the Japanese ground forces. While the Allies had the advantage on land and in the air, the two battles at sea damaged American aircraft carriers.

Following the decisive Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, the Japanese abandoned their attempts to retake Henderson Field, though fighting would continue for a few more months. In all the campaign lasted a total of six months and two days. During the course of the campaign there were a total of 17 battles, which included Tulagii, Tenaru, Edson’s Ridge, Matanikau, Henderson Field, Mt. Austen, Eastern Solomons, Cape Esperance, and Santa Cruz Island, among others.

The Japanese made their last evacuations in early February, and when the Allied commanders realized this, they declared the Guadalcanal Campaign to be over on February 9, 1943. The Guadalcanal Campaign marked a shift in the war’s dynamic. The Allies transitioned from defensive operations to creating a strategic offensive, leading to the Solomon Islands, New Guinea, and Central Pacific Campaigns. Additionally, the Japanese suffered over 19,000 dead and were unable to replace lost aircraft and ships, placing them at a disadvantage for the remainder of the war.