#4198e – 2007 42c Alpine Tundra: Bighorn Sheep FDC

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.65
$1.65
1 More - Click Here

U.S. #4198e
Alpine Tundra
Bighorn Sheep
Nature of America

Issue Date: August 28, 2007
City:
Estes Park, CO
Quantity Issued: 5,000,000

Alpine tundra can be found above the tree line in high mountain areas throughout the world.  The word tundra is a Lappish word meaning “land of no trees.”

Growing above 11,500 feet, the small tundra grasses, sedges, herbs, and shrubs face frigid weather and winds of more than 170 miles per hour.  If damaged, tundra can take hundreds of years to recover.

Alpine tundra plants, lichens, and mosses survive long winters, blizzards, and dry, rocky soil.  They grow very slowly, close to the ground.  Their extensive root systems absorb scarce water and nutrients and provide anchorage against the wind.  During the short summer blooming period, an abundance of showy flowers can be seen.

Many animals and birds leave the Alpine tundra in the winter.  Of those that stay, some hibernate, like the marmots and ground squirrels.  These animals eat large amounts of food to build up body fat before hibernation.  Some small mammals, like voles, store hay in burrows and dens for winter feeding.  Others, like rabbits, hunt and scavenge for food all winter.

The ninth installment of the U.S. Postal Service’s Nature of America Series shows the Alpine tundra of the Rocky Mountains during the summer season.

Read More - Click Here

  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2017 Commemorative Year Set 2017 U.S. Commemorative Year Set

    Get every US commemorative stamp issued in 2017.  Each stamp showcases important history, people, and events from American culture.  With this set you'll receive stamps from popular series like Lunar New Year and Love.  Plus you'll receive the Nebraska and Mississippi Statehood stamps, Dorothy Height, John F. Kennedy, and more.  It's the convenient and affordable way to keep your collection up to date.

    $31.95- $55.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1847 5¢ Benjamin Franklin, red-brown, thin bluish wove paper, imperforate U.S. #1 - First U.S. Postage Stamp

    On July 1, 1847, the first US postage stamps went on sale.  The 5¢ issue of 1847 (US #1) features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, the man responsible for organizing America's postal service back in the 1700s.  Postal clerks used scissors to cut the stamps from sheets, as perforations weren't in use yet.  Today, US #1 is a valued piece of American postal history and a lucky find in any condition.

    $450.00- $7,395.00
    BUY NOW

U.S. #4198e
Alpine Tundra
Bighorn Sheep
Nature of America

Issue Date: August 28, 2007
City:
Estes Park, CO
Quantity Issued: 5,000,000

Alpine tundra can be found above the tree line in high mountain areas throughout the world.  The word tundra is a Lappish word meaning “land of no trees.”

Growing above 11,500 feet, the small tundra grasses, sedges, herbs, and shrubs face frigid weather and winds of more than 170 miles per hour.  If damaged, tundra can take hundreds of years to recover.

Alpine tundra plants, lichens, and mosses survive long winters, blizzards, and dry, rocky soil.  They grow very slowly, close to the ground.  Their extensive root systems absorb scarce water and nutrients and provide anchorage against the wind.  During the short summer blooming period, an abundance of showy flowers can be seen.

Many animals and birds leave the Alpine tundra in the winter.  Of those that stay, some hibernate, like the marmots and ground squirrels.  These animals eat large amounts of food to build up body fat before hibernation.  Some small mammals, like voles, store hay in burrows and dens for winter feeding.  Others, like rabbits, hunt and scavenge for food all winter.

The ninth installment of the U.S. Postal Service’s Nature of America Series shows the Alpine tundra of the Rocky Mountains during the summer season.