#4221 – 2008 41c Chinese Lunar New Year: Year of the Rat

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.65FREE with 330 points!
$1.65
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.20
$0.20
5 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM637215x32mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM67145x32mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$4.25
$4.25
- MM420747x32mm 50 Horizontal Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$4.75
$4.75
U.S. #4221
Lunar New Year –
Year of the Rat

Issue Date: January 9, 2008
City: San Francisco, CA

The 2008 Chinese New Year begins February 7 as the Year of the Rat. The Chinese New Year starts with the second new moon after winter commences. The celebration lasts for fifteen days, ending with the Lantern Festival. 
 

First U.S. Chinese New Year Stamp

On December 30, 1992, the USPS issued its first Chinese New Year stamp, honoring the start of the Year of the Rooster.

The issue of this stamp was in part inspired by repeated requests for stamps to honor additional holidays – New Year’s, Easter, the Fourth of July, and Thanksgiving. There had also been calls for stamps honoring the signs of the Zodiac. There had also been several groups calling for stamps to recognize the contributions of Asian Americans, while the USPS wanted to explore topics to appeal to younger Asian American collectors.

The stamp was designed by a first-time stamp designer, Clarence Lee, who used an airbrush to produce the artwork. The last stamp issued that year, it went on sale on December 30, 1992, and proved extremely popular. Many post offices sold out of their stocks in days and the stamp was in high demand in Asia.

The 1992 Chinese New Year stamp marked several firsts. In addition to being the first Lunar New Year stamp, it was also the first Happy New Year stamp, and the first non-high-value stamp issued in panes of 20 (rather than 50).

When the stamp was first produced, the USPS didn’t have plans to produce more Lunar New Year stamps. But based on the popularity of the Rooster stamp, they knew a series would be popular and issued a second Chinese New Year stamp on February 5, 1994.

The final stamp in the initial series was issued in 2004, honoring the year of the monkey. The following year, the USPS decided to issue a souvenir sheet picturing all 12 Chinese New Year designs. At the 2005 first-class rate of 37¢, however, the cost of the sheet would have been $4.44 for 12 stamps. The number four is an unlucky number in Asia.

The Postal Service decided to make the sheet double-sided. The total price of the sheet of 24 then became $8.88; eight is a lucky number in Asia. In 2006, the first-class rate became 39¢, the total for a sheet of 12 was $4.68, and production of a single-sided sheet was possible – as luck would have it.

Based on the popularity of these stamps, the USPS inaugurated a new Lunar New Year series in 2008, beginning with the Year of the Rat.

Click here for lots more Chinese and Lunar New Year stamps.

Click here to learn more about the Chinese New Year including its history, traditions, and much more.

Read More - Click Here


  • 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Bugs Bunny 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Bugs Bunny

    In 2020, the United States Postal Service issued a set of 10 new Forever stamps picturing some of Bugs' most iconic costumes.  Add these popular stamps to your collection now!

    $10.95- $21.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2019 Complete Year Set of U.S. Commemoratives and Regular Issues - 116 Stamps 2019 Complete Year Set Stamps

    Save time and money with this year-set. You'll receive every major Scott number issued in 2019 – including the Priority and Express Mail stamps – in one order. It's the easy way to keep your collection up to date. 

    $126.00- $171.00
    BUY NOW
  • 1/2 lb. US Mixture, on/off paper US 1/2 Pound Stamp Mixture

    This fun mixture of U.S. stamps is made up of completely random years, and will contain both used stamps on and off paper. It is packaged by weight, and you will get a full 1/2 lb of stamps to sort through and identify- hours of fun at your kitchen table!

    $19.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #4221
Lunar New Year –
Year of the Rat

Issue Date: January 9, 2008
City: San Francisco, CA

The 2008 Chinese New Year begins February 7 as the Year of the Rat. The Chinese New Year starts with the second new moon after winter commences. The celebration lasts for fifteen days, ending with the Lantern Festival. 
 

First U.S. Chinese New Year Stamp

On December 30, 1992, the USPS issued its first Chinese New Year stamp, honoring the start of the Year of the Rooster.

The issue of this stamp was in part inspired by repeated requests for stamps to honor additional holidays – New Year’s, Easter, the Fourth of July, and Thanksgiving. There had also been calls for stamps honoring the signs of the Zodiac. There had also been several groups calling for stamps to recognize the contributions of Asian Americans, while the USPS wanted to explore topics to appeal to younger Asian American collectors.

The stamp was designed by a first-time stamp designer, Clarence Lee, who used an airbrush to produce the artwork. The last stamp issued that year, it went on sale on December 30, 1992, and proved extremely popular. Many post offices sold out of their stocks in days and the stamp was in high demand in Asia.

The 1992 Chinese New Year stamp marked several firsts. In addition to being the first Lunar New Year stamp, it was also the first Happy New Year stamp, and the first non-high-value stamp issued in panes of 20 (rather than 50).

When the stamp was first produced, the USPS didn’t have plans to produce more Lunar New Year stamps. But based on the popularity of the Rooster stamp, they knew a series would be popular and issued a second Chinese New Year stamp on February 5, 1994.

The final stamp in the initial series was issued in 2004, honoring the year of the monkey. The following year, the USPS decided to issue a souvenir sheet picturing all 12 Chinese New Year designs. At the 2005 first-class rate of 37¢, however, the cost of the sheet would have been $4.44 for 12 stamps. The number four is an unlucky number in Asia.

The Postal Service decided to make the sheet double-sided. The total price of the sheet of 24 then became $8.88; eight is a lucky number in Asia. In 2006, the first-class rate became 39¢, the total for a sheet of 12 was $4.68, and production of a single-sided sheet was possible – as luck would have it.

Based on the popularity of these stamps, the USPS inaugurated a new Lunar New Year series in 2008, beginning with the Year of the Rat.

Click here for lots more Chinese and Lunar New Year stamps.

Click here to learn more about the Chinese New Year including its history, traditions, and much more.