#4238 – 2008 42c Flags 24/7: Flag at Dawn s/a

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$2.65FREE with 460 points!
$2.65
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.30
$0.30
1 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50327x30mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420027x30mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50

American Flag 24/7
Flag at Dawn
Die Cut 11 with Square Corners

Issue Date:  April 18, 2008
City:  Washington, DC

The Stars and Stripes is the most recognizable symbol of American independence.  Established in 1942, the Flag Code outlines the proper procedures for handling and displaying the American flag.  When the flag is raised, normally at sunrise, it is to be hoisted quickly.  In the military, the flag is raised at the start of the bugle call “Reveille,” and should be saluted. 

When raising multiple flags, the American flag should be the first one raised.  According to the Flag Code, the American flag should always be displayed in a place of prominence.  Generally, it should be flown on its own right (the viewer’s left).  The exception is in instances where there is a taller, middle pole, which is where the American flag should fly.  Whenever the American flag is displayed, the Union (the blue field with the stars) should be on the viewer’s left.  As a sign of respect to our nation, no other flag should fly above the American flag, and all national flags should be flown at the same height. 

Because “this flag dips to no earthly king,” the American flag is never to be dipped to any person or thing.  Out of respect, it must never touch the ground.  In addition, it should never be flown upside down, unless it is being used as a distress signal. 

In 2008, the American flag was honored on a set of U.S. postage stamps showing the flag at different times of day.

Read More - Click Here


American Flag 24/7
Flag at Dawn
Die Cut 11 with Square Corners

Issue Date:  April 18, 2008
City:  Washington, DC

The Stars and Stripes is the most recognizable symbol of American independence.  Established in 1942, the Flag Code outlines the proper procedures for handling and displaying the American flag.  When the flag is raised, normally at sunrise, it is to be hoisted quickly.  In the military, the flag is raised at the start of the bugle call “Reveille,” and should be saluted. 

When raising multiple flags, the American flag should be the first one raised.  According to the Flag Code, the American flag should always be displayed in a place of prominence.  Generally, it should be flown on its own right (the viewer’s left).  The exception is in instances where there is a taller, middle pole, which is where the American flag should fly.  Whenever the American flag is displayed, the Union (the blue field with the stars) should be on the viewer’s left.  As a sign of respect to our nation, no other flag should fly above the American flag, and all national flags should be flown at the same height. 

Because “this flag dips to no earthly king,” the American flag is never to be dipped to any person or thing.  Out of respect, it must never touch the ground.  In addition, it should never be flown upside down, unless it is being used as a distress signal. 

In 2008, the American flag was honored on a set of U.S. postage stamps showing the flag at different times of day.