#4239 – 2008 42c Flags 24/7: Flag at Midday s/a

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American Flag 24/7
Flag at Midday
Die Cut 11 with Square Corners

Issue Date:  April 18, 2008
City:  Washington, DC

In 1942, Congress issued the Flag Code as a set of guidelines concerning how the American flag should be treated and displayed.  Except during periods of mourning, the flag should be flown from the top of the flag pole, or at “full-mast.”  Only the President can declare that the flag be flown at half-mast, usually due to the death of an important figure, such as a political or religious leader.  To display the flag at half-mast, it must first be hoisted quickly to full-mast, and then drawn down to half-mast.  The official holidays when the flag should be flown at half-mast include Memorial Day (the flag is flown at half-mast until noon, and then at full-mast until sunset); Patriot Day; and Pearl Harbor Day.  The Flag Code also details the rules concerning alternate uses of the flag.  The code states that the American flag should never be used for advertising purposes, and should never be printed on or placed on anything that will likely be discarded after its use.  Postage stamps seem to be an exception to this rule, because they are issued to commemorate the importance of one of our nation’s greatest symbols.  Old Glory, a symbol of the American will and determination, was honored on a set of 2008 U.S. postage stamps showing the flag at different times of day.

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American Flag 24/7
Flag at Midday
Die Cut 11 with Square Corners

Issue Date:  April 18, 2008
City:  Washington, DC

In 1942, Congress issued the Flag Code as a set of guidelines concerning how the American flag should be treated and displayed.  Except during periods of mourning, the flag should be flown from the top of the flag pole, or at “full-mast.”  Only the President can declare that the flag be flown at half-mast, usually due to the death of an important figure, such as a political or religious leader.  To display the flag at half-mast, it must first be hoisted quickly to full-mast, and then drawn down to half-mast.  The official holidays when the flag should be flown at half-mast include Memorial Day (the flag is flown at half-mast until noon, and then at full-mast until sunset); Patriot Day; and Pearl Harbor Day.  The Flag Code also details the rules concerning alternate uses of the flag.  The code states that the American flag should never be used for advertising purposes, and should never be printed on or placed on anything that will likely be discarded after its use.  Postage stamps seem to be an exception to this rule, because they are issued to commemorate the importance of one of our nation’s greatest symbols.  Old Glory, a symbol of the American will and determination, was honored on a set of 2008 U.S. postage stamps showing the flag at different times of day.