#4240-43 – 2008 42c Flags 24/7 AV 8 1/2 vert. perf.

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$7.95FREE with 1,580 points!
$7.95
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.20
$1.20
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Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636 25 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
$7.50

Please note:  Due to the layout of the pane, the se-tenant may or may not be provided in Scott Catalogue order.

The American flag, a symbol of our country’s triumph over oppression and our dream of freedom, was honored on a set of four 2008 U.S. postage stamps.  The set, titled “American Flag 24/7,” shows the American flag at four different times of day – sunrise, noon, sunset, and night. 

In 1942, Congress issued a set of guidelines detailing the proper treatment of our nation’s most sacred banner.  According to the code, when the flag is raised on the pole (normally at sunrise) it should be raised quickly and be properly saluted.  On Memorial Day, the flag is flown at half mast until noon, and then raised to full mast until sunset.  To do this properly, the flag should first be hoisted quickly to full mast, and then be drawn down respectfully to half mast.  Then at noon, it should once again be briskly raised to full mast. 

When taking the flag down at sunset, it should be lowered slowly and ceremoniously.  The common civilian tradition is to play “Taps” and place one’s right hand over the heart.  While the code states that the flag should be taken down at night, it is acceptable to leave it flying if it is properly lit.  Because “this flag dips to no earthly king,” the flag is never to be dipped to any person or thing.  It should never be used for any advertising purposes, placed on anyting that is intended to be discarded, or have any marks made on it. 

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  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2017 Commemorative Year Set 2017 U.S. Commemorative Year Set

    Get every US commemorative stamp issued in 2017.  Each stamp showcases important history, people, and events from American culture.  With this set you'll receive stamps from popular series like Lunar New Year and Love.  Plus you'll receive the Nebraska and Mississippi Statehood stamps, Dorothy Height, John F. Kennedy, and more.  It's the convenient and affordable way to keep your collection up to date.

    $31.95- $55.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1847 5¢ Benjamin Franklin, red-brown, thin bluish wove paper, imperforate U.S. #1 - First U.S. Postage Stamp

    On July 1, 1847, the first US postage stamps went on sale.  The 5¢ issue of 1847 (US #1) features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, the man responsible for organizing America's postal service back in the 1700s.  Postal clerks used scissors to cut the stamps from sheets, as perforations weren't in use yet.  Today, US #1 is a valued piece of American postal history and a lucky find in any condition.

    $450.00- $7,395.00
    BUY NOW

Please note:  Due to the layout of the pane, the se-tenant may or may not be provided in Scott Catalogue order.

The American flag, a symbol of our country’s triumph over oppression and our dream of freedom, was honored on a set of four 2008 U.S. postage stamps.  The set, titled “American Flag 24/7,” shows the American flag at four different times of day – sunrise, noon, sunset, and night. 

In 1942, Congress issued a set of guidelines detailing the proper treatment of our nation’s most sacred banner.  According to the code, when the flag is raised on the pole (normally at sunrise) it should be raised quickly and be properly saluted.  On Memorial Day, the flag is flown at half mast until noon, and then raised to full mast until sunset.  To do this properly, the flag should first be hoisted quickly to full mast, and then be drawn down respectfully to half mast.  Then at noon, it should once again be briskly raised to full mast. 

When taking the flag down at sunset, it should be lowered slowly and ceremoniously.  The common civilian tradition is to play “Taps” and place one’s right hand over the heart.  While the code states that the flag should be taken down at night, it is acceptable to leave it flying if it is properly lit.  Because “this flag dips to no earthly king,” the flag is never to be dipped to any person or thing.  It should never be used for any advertising purposes, placed on anyting that is intended to be discarded, or have any marks made on it.