#4244 – 2008 42c Flags 24/7: Flag at Dusk s/a

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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- MM643215x44mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
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American Flag 24/7
Flag at Dusk
Die Cut 11

Issue Date:  April 18, 2008
City:  Washington, DC

The Flag Code, which was established in 1942, gives Americans an outline of how they should treat their flag.  When lowering the flag (normally taken down around sunset) it should be brought down in a slow and ceremonious manner, so as to give all present a chance to show their respect for our nation’s most enduring symbol.  Traditionally, civilians play the bugle call “Taps” while the flag is lowered.  Members of the military often play “To the Color” or “Retreat.”  The flag should be saluted from the time it is lowered until it is removed from the pole or the last note of music is played, whichever is longer. 

For civilians, the proper salute is removing anything from their head and placing their right hand over their heart.  When the flag is being removed from the pole, it should never touch the ground and should be carefully and ceremoniously folded. 

There are certain days when it is customary to fly the flag.  These days include New Year’s Day, Inauguration Day, Lincoln’s Birthday, Flag Day, Independence Day, Veteran’s Day, and Thanksgiving Day. 

The Star Spangled Banner, a high-flying emblem of hope and unity, was honored on a set of 2008 U.S. postage stamps titled “American Flag 24/7,” showing the American flag at different times of day.

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American Flag 24/7
Flag at Dusk
Die Cut 11

Issue Date:  April 18, 2008
City:  Washington, DC

The Flag Code, which was established in 1942, gives Americans an outline of how they should treat their flag.  When lowering the flag (normally taken down around sunset) it should be brought down in a slow and ceremonious manner, so as to give all present a chance to show their respect for our nation’s most enduring symbol.  Traditionally, civilians play the bugle call “Taps” while the flag is lowered.  Members of the military often play “To the Color” or “Retreat.”  The flag should be saluted from the time it is lowered until it is removed from the pole or the last note of music is played, whichever is longer. 

For civilians, the proper salute is removing anything from their head and placing their right hand over their heart.  When the flag is being removed from the pole, it should never touch the ground and should be carefully and ceremoniously folded. 

There are certain days when it is customary to fly the flag.  These days include New Year’s Day, Inauguration Day, Lincoln’s Birthday, Flag Day, Independence Day, Veteran’s Day, and Thanksgiving Day. 

The Star Spangled Banner, a high-flying emblem of hope and unity, was honored on a set of 2008 U.S. postage stamps titled “American Flag 24/7,” showing the American flag at different times of day.