#4320 – 2011 First-Class Forever Stamp - Flags of Our Nation: S.Carolina

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U.S. #4320
2011 44¢ South Carolina
Flags of Our Nation

Issue Date: August 11, 2011
City: Columbus, Ohio
Printed By: Sennett Security Products
Printing Method: Photogravure
Color: multicolored
 
Flags of Our Nation, Set V: The Flags of Our Nation stamps issued in 2011 is the fifth group of the series. The stamps show historic state flags, as well as a “snapshot” image that shares some of each state’s character.
 
 In 1765, South Carolina protesters of the Stamp Act marched behind a blue flag with three white crescents. Their banner became the basis for the “Palmetto State” flag.
 
When the American Revolution began in 1775, troops from South Carolina needed a flag. Colonel Moultrie designed one using the blue from the soldiers’ uniforms and the crescent emblem worn on their caps. Moultrie and his men successfully defended a fort on Sullivan’s Island that was made from palmetto logs. In honor of their heroism, a palmetto tree was added to the state’s flag in 1861 and the island was renamed Moultrie Island.
 
When South Carolina became the first state to secede from the Union in 1860, the new Republic of South Carolina needed a national flag. The first attempt was a gold palmetto tree with a white background. It became known as the “2-day flag” when the color of the tree was changed to white and the background to blue. 
 
The new flag was flown over Fort Sumter when the Confederate Army defeated Union troops on April 14, 1861. When the war ended and the Union was restored, South Carolina adopted the palmetto tree and crescent design to be used on its state flag.
 
 
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U.S. #4320
2011 44¢ South Carolina
Flags of Our Nation

Issue Date: August 11, 2011
City: Columbus, Ohio
Printed By: Sennett Security Products
Printing Method: Photogravure
Color: multicolored
 
Flags of Our Nation, Set V: The Flags of Our Nation stamps issued in 2011 is the fifth group of the series. The stamps show historic state flags, as well as a “snapshot” image that shares some of each state’s character.
 
 In 1765, South Carolina protesters of the Stamp Act marched behind a blue flag with three white crescents. Their banner became the basis for the “Palmetto State” flag.
 
When the American Revolution began in 1775, troops from South Carolina needed a flag. Colonel Moultrie designed one using the blue from the soldiers’ uniforms and the crescent emblem worn on their caps. Moultrie and his men successfully defended a fort on Sullivan’s Island that was made from palmetto logs. In honor of their heroism, a palmetto tree was added to the state’s flag in 1861 and the island was renamed Moultrie Island.
 
When South Carolina became the first state to secede from the Union in 1860, the new Republic of South Carolina needed a national flag. The first attempt was a gold palmetto tree with a white background. It became known as the “2-day flag” when the color of the tree was changed to white and the background to blue. 
 
The new flag was flown over Fort Sumter when the Confederate Army defeated Union troops on April 14, 1861. When the war ended and the Union was restored, South Carolina adopted the palmetto tree and crescent design to be used on its state flag.