#4323 – 2012 First-Class Forever Stamp - Flags of Our Nation: Texas

U.S. #4323

2012 45¢ Texas

Flags of Our Nation 

 

Issue Date: August 16, 2012

City: Sacramento, CA

Quantity: 25,000,000

Printed By: American Packaging Corp for Sennett Security Products

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: Multicolored

 

 

Flags of Our Nation, Set VI:  2012 marks the sixth and final set of stamps in the series.  The state and territory flags reflect the history of each region they represent.  The uniqueness of each state flag in the series reflects the diversity of the United States and its territories.    

The pledge of allegiance to the Texas flag ends with the phrase, “One state under God, one and indivisible.”  The single star on the “Lone Star Flag” mirrors the state’s history of independence and unity.

 

The present design was approved by the Republic of Texas in 1839.  Dr. Charles Stewart, the first secretary of state of Texas, used one star on the flag to indicate “the united will of the citizens of the new Republic of Texas.”  A 1997 proclamation acknowledged Montgomery County, where Stewart lived, as the official birthplace of the Texas flag.

 

The red and white stripes may have come from the flag of the short-lived Republic of Fredonia, representing the Cherokee Indians and white settlers who signed an agreement to fight together for independence from Mexico.  The stripes may have also been inspired by the United States flag.  As with our national flag, the red stands for bravery, the white for purity, and the blue field represents loyalty.

 

The Republic of Texas became part of the United States in 1845.  The “Lone Star Flag” remained the same, while another star was added to “Old Glory.”  

 

In a 2001 survey by a national flag association, the Texas flag ranked second-to-best state flag design.  Its simple design makes it easy to see from a distance.  

 
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U.S. #4323

2012 45¢ Texas

Flags of Our Nation 

 

Issue Date: August 16, 2012

City: Sacramento, CA

Quantity: 25,000,000

Printed By: American Packaging Corp for Sennett Security Products

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: Multicolored

 

 

Flags of Our Nation, Set VI:  2012 marks the sixth and final set of stamps in the series.  The state and territory flags reflect the history of each region they represent.  The uniqueness of each state flag in the series reflects the diversity of the United States and its territories.  

 

The pledge of allegiance to the Texas flag ends with the phrase, “One state under God, one and indivisible.”  The single star on the “Lone Star Flag” mirrors the state’s history of independence and unity.

 

The present design was approved by the Republic of Texas in 1839.  Dr. Charles Stewart, the first secretary of state of Texas, used one star on the flag to indicate “the united will of the citizens of the new Republic of Texas.”  A 1997 proclamation acknowledged Montgomery County, where Stewart lived, as the official birthplace of the Texas flag.

 

The red and white stripes may have come from the flag of the short-lived Republic of Fredonia, representing the Cherokee Indians and white settlers who signed an agreement to fight together for independence from Mexico.  The stripes may have also been inspired by the United States flag.  As with our national flag, the red stands for bravery, the white for purity, and the blue field represents loyalty.

 

The Republic of Texas became part of the United States in 1845.  The “Lone Star Flag” remained the same, while another star was added to “Old Glory.”  

 

In a 2001 survey by a national flag association, the Texas flag ranked second-to-best state flag design.  Its simple design makes it easy to see from a distance.