#4401 – 2009 44c Bart Simpson

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.80
$1.80
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.40
$0.40
2 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM21645 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 30 x 37 millimeters (1-3/16 x 1-7/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.95
$0.95

The Simpsons
Bart

Issue Date: May 7, 2009
City: Los Angeles, CA

Bart is America’s bad boy.  On the satirical television show, he is a class clown who thumbs his nose at authority.  According to critic Robert Bianco, Bart is “...the child we wish we’d been, and fear our children will become.”

Bart is a 10-year-old boy who breaks all of the rules.  He frequently disrupts class, pulls pranks on adults, and never gets in trouble with his parents.  Bart’s hallmark is writing on the chalkboard in detention, a sight-gag that started early on the show.  With production of an episode taking up to six months, it allows Bart to respond to current events. After Vice President Dan Quayle’s improper spelling of potato, Bart wrote, “It’s potato, not potatoe” repeatedly on the blackboard.

Bart’s attitude has earned the show millions of fans and boatloads of controversy.  He was labeled a bad influence on children by parent groups and educators.  Bart tee shirts were banned at many schools.  President George H.W. Bush once said that he wanted to make “American families a lot more like the Waltons and a lot less like the Simpsons.”  In the next episode, Bart responded to the President by saying, “Hey, we’re just like the Waltons. We’re praying for an end to the Depression too.”  

Read More - Click Here

  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2017 Commemorative Year Set 2017 U.S. Commemorative Year Set

    Get every US commemorative stamp issued in 2017.  Each stamp showcases important history, people, and events from American culture.  With this set you'll receive stamps from popular series like Lunar New Year and Love.  Plus you'll receive the Nebraska and Mississippi Statehood stamps, Dorothy Height, John F. Kennedy, and more.  It's the convenient and affordable way to keep your collection up to date.

    $31.95- $55.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1847 5¢ Benjamin Franklin, red-brown, thin bluish wove paper, imperforate U.S. #1 - First U.S. Postage Stamp

    On July 1, 1847, the first US postage stamps went on sale.  The 5¢ issue of 1847 (US #1) features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, the man responsible for organizing America's postal service back in the 1700s.  Postal clerks used scissors to cut the stamps from sheets, as perforations weren't in use yet.  Today, US #1 is a valued piece of American postal history and a lucky find in any condition.

    $450.00- $7,395.00
    BUY NOW

The Simpsons
Bart

Issue Date: May 7, 2009
City: Los Angeles, CA

Bart is America’s bad boy.  On the satirical television show, he is a class clown who thumbs his nose at authority.  According to critic Robert Bianco, Bart is “...the child we wish we’d been, and fear our children will become.”

Bart is a 10-year-old boy who breaks all of the rules.  He frequently disrupts class, pulls pranks on adults, and never gets in trouble with his parents.  Bart’s hallmark is writing on the chalkboard in detention, a sight-gag that started early on the show.  With production of an episode taking up to six months, it allows Bart to respond to current events. After Vice President Dan Quayle’s improper spelling of potato, Bart wrote, “It’s potato, not potatoe” repeatedly on the blackboard.

Bart’s attitude has earned the show millions of fans and boatloads of controversy.  He was labeled a bad influence on children by parent groups and educators.  Bart tee shirts were banned at many schools.  President George H.W. Bush once said that he wanted to make “American families a lot more like the Waltons and a lot less like the Simpsons.”  In the next episode, Bart responded to the President by saying, “Hey, we’re just like the Waltons. We’re praying for an end to the Depression too.”