#4414a – 2009 44c Early TV Memories: Texaco Star Theater

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Early TV Memories –
Texaco Star Theater

 

Issued: August 11, 2009
North Hollywood, CA 

 

“When I was growing up, there was one family on our street who could afford a television.  Every Tuesday night they would set up folding chairs, about a dozen, and we’d all come over and watch it; everyone called it the Milton Berle Show.  It was a real social occasion.  The show was high on comedy and full of sight gags.  Milton played in skits and also did a monologue.  Quite a few of his characters were in drag.” – Dorothy F.

 

By 1948, television was just starting to take off.  But it needed a face, a superstar, and it found one on radio.  Texaco Star Theater transferred its successful radio show to television, and brought along “Uncle Miltie.”  The show was a smash hit, with as many as four out of every five television sets tuned in.  This variety show had a little bit of everything, including smiling representatives of the sponsor singing the theme song and performing good deeds throughout the show.

 

Image shown is part of complete se-tenant 4414.

 

   

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Early TV Memories –
Texaco Star Theater

 

Issued: August 11, 2009
North Hollywood, CA 

 

“When I was growing up, there was one family on our street who could afford a television.  Every Tuesday night they would set up folding chairs, about a dozen, and we’d all come over and watch it; everyone called it the Milton Berle Show.  It was a real social occasion.  The show was high on comedy and full of sight gags.  Milton played in skits and also did a monologue.  Quite a few of his characters were in drag.” – Dorothy F.

 

By 1948, television was just starting to take off.  But it needed a face, a superstar, and it found one on radio.  Texaco Star Theater transferred its successful radio show to television, and brought along “Uncle Miltie.”  The show was a smash hit, with as many as four out of every five television sets tuned in.  This variety show had a little bit of everything, including smiling representatives of the sponsor singing the theme song and performing good deeds throughout the show.

 

Image shown is part of complete se-tenant 4414.