#4414g – 2009 44c Early TV Memories: Hopalong Cassidy

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$2.00
$2.00
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.50
$1.50
1 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM641215x38mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM77748x38mm 5 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$1.50
$1.50

Early Television Memories
Hopalong Cassidy

Issue Date: August 11, 2009
City: North Hollywood, CA

“When I was a kid, every Saturday we’d go to see ‘Hopalong Cassidy’ flicks and watch his shows.  Oh, he was so handsome, with his white hair and he’d always do what was right.  I loved his horse, Topper.  But he never kissed the girl.  It was so tame compared to today, but I’d still rather my grandkids watch it.  It was corny, but fun.” – Joyce P.

In early television, heroes wore white and bad guys wore black – a simple, but effective imagery.  Not so for Hopalong Cassidy.  In the rough-and-tumble West, black-clad Cassidy was a model of virtue.  He didn’t drink, smoke, or swear.  He was always polite to the ladies, and used proper grammar.  He had gleaming white hair even as a young man, and wore a black hat.  “Hoppy” and his companions protected folks from cattle rustlers and outlaw gangs, providing a standard of decency in the untamed West that was also a model for his young, modern viewers.

Read More - Click Here


Early Television Memories
Hopalong Cassidy

Issue Date: August 11, 2009
City: North Hollywood, CA

“When I was a kid, every Saturday we’d go to see ‘Hopalong Cassidy’ flicks and watch his shows.  Oh, he was so handsome, with his white hair and he’d always do what was right.  I loved his horse, Topper.  But he never kissed the girl.  It was so tame compared to today, but I’d still rather my grandkids watch it.  It was corny, but fun.” – Joyce P.

In early television, heroes wore white and bad guys wore black – a simple, but effective imagery.  Not so for Hopalong Cassidy.  In the rough-and-tumble West, black-clad Cassidy was a model of virtue.  He didn’t drink, smoke, or swear.  He was always polite to the ladies, and used proper grammar.  He had gleaming white hair even as a young man, and wore a black hat.  “Hoppy” and his companions protected folks from cattle rustlers and outlaw gangs, providing a standard of decency in the untamed West that was also a model for his young, modern viewers.