#4414h – 2009 44c Early TV Memories: You Bet Your Life

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Early Television Memories
You Bet Your Life

Issue Date: August 11, 2009
City: North Hollywood, CA

“This was funny!  Groucho Marx’s humor was a little on the ‘blue’ side – he’d give just the suggestion of naughtiness.  The interviews were funnier than the quiz itself.  The announcer, George Fenneman, was very handsome.  He was straight-faced and never laughed at Groucho.  I enjoyed the Secret ‘Woid’ Duck – it came down when the Secret Word was said.  Groucho usually gave hints about what it was.” – Joyce P.

No matter how innocent the comment, one waggle of this game show host’s bushy brows could turn it into a blushing confession.  Often the interaction between host and contestants was more interesting than the game itself.  Each week a pair of contestants, usually including one celebrity, answered contest questions for cash prizes and matched wits with their host.  The larger-than-life comic entertained early audiences for 11 years and helped set the standard for future game shows.

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Early Television Memories
You Bet Your Life

Issue Date: August 11, 2009
City: North Hollywood, CA

“This was funny!  Groucho Marx’s humor was a little on the ‘blue’ side – he’d give just the suggestion of naughtiness.  The interviews were funnier than the quiz itself.  The announcer, George Fenneman, was very handsome.  He was straight-faced and never laughed at Groucho.  I enjoyed the Secret ‘Woid’ Duck – it came down when the Secret Word was said.  Groucho usually gave hints about what it was.” – Joyce P.

No matter how innocent the comment, one waggle of this game show host’s bushy brows could turn it into a blushing confession.  Often the interaction between host and contestants was more interesting than the game itself.  Each week a pair of contestants, usually including one celebrity, answered contest questions for cash prizes and matched wits with their host.  The larger-than-life comic entertained early audiences for 11 years and helped set the standard for future game shows.