#4414o – 2009 44c Early TV Memories: Alfred Hitchcock Presents

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Early Television Memories
Alfred Hitchcock Presents

Issue Date: August 11, 2009
City: North Hollywood, CA

“It was the scariest show I ever saw!  All my siblings watched it, and I would watch it through an afghan blanket, and peek through the holes in the knitting because I was so scared.  The scariest one I remember was an episode with a babysitter who kept getting phone calls from a guy on the street, only you soon realized he was inside the house.” – Coramae M.

The “Master of Suspense” brought terror into American homes – and audiences loved it.  For a director known for his horror films, Alfred also enjoyed sharing his playfully morbid sense of humor with an audience uncertain if it should laugh.  Audiences accustomed to light-hearted variety shows and middle-class dramas were introduced to taut thrillers that featured some of the best-known actors of the day.  Frequently, the villains appeared to succeed in their mischief.  But Alfred always came back to explain how the villains had actually received the justice they deserved.

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Early Television Memories
Alfred Hitchcock Presents

Issue Date: August 11, 2009
City: North Hollywood, CA

“It was the scariest show I ever saw!  All my siblings watched it, and I would watch it through an afghan blanket, and peek through the holes in the knitting because I was so scared.  The scariest one I remember was an episode with a babysitter who kept getting phone calls from a guy on the street, only you soon realized he was inside the house.” – Coramae M.

The “Master of Suspense” brought terror into American homes – and audiences loved it.  For a director known for his horror films, Alfred also enjoyed sharing his playfully morbid sense of humor with an audience uncertain if it should laugh.  Audiences accustomed to light-hearted variety shows and middle-class dramas were introduced to taut thrillers that featured some of the best-known actors of the day.  Frequently, the villains appeared to succeed in their mischief.  But Alfred always came back to explain how the villains had actually received the justice they deserved.