#4417 – 2009 44c Thanksgiving Parade, Crowd

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.90
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.50
2 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63725 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 32 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-1/4 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
- MM67150 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 45 x 32 millimeters (1-3/4 x 1-1/4 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$8.00

Thanksgiving Day Parade
The Crowd

Issue Date: September 9, 2009
City: New York, NY

In the 1920s, many of Macy’s Department Store employees were first-generation immigrants.  They wanted to give thanks for their new life in America with a traditional celebration from their European homeland – a parade.

They held the first Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City in 1924.  The pageant featured store employees dressed as clowns and cowboys, with bands and live animals.  The procession ended, as it has ever since, with a float carrying Santa Claus into Herald Square, signaling the transition to the Christmas season.  Over a quarter of a million smiling faces watched the parade its first year.  It was hailed a success and declared an annual event.

The number of spectators increased each year and grew to one million by the Depression years.  The parade was postponed during World War II.  In 1945, the soldiers came home and people lined the streets again to see the first postwar parade.

The audience became national in 1948 when the parade was broadcast from coast to coast.  People from around the country could watch the festivities.

The Thanksgiving Day Parade has become an American tradition.  Today, 3 million people line the streets of Manhattan and another 44 million watch the pageantry on television.

Read More - Click Here

  • U.S. Album with 100 postally used stamps, 1,000 hinges, and a free stamp collecting guide U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps 3-Volume American Heirloom Album

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Mystic Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Volume I, 1847-1934 Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

Thanksgiving Day Parade
The Crowd

Issue Date: September 9, 2009
City: New York, NY

In the 1920s, many of Macy’s Department Store employees were first-generation immigrants.  They wanted to give thanks for their new life in America with a traditional celebration from their European homeland – a parade.

They held the first Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City in 1924.  The pageant featured store employees dressed as clowns and cowboys, with bands and live animals.  The procession ended, as it has ever since, with a float carrying Santa Claus into Herald Square, signaling the transition to the Christmas season.  Over a quarter of a million smiling faces watched the parade its first year.  It was hailed a success and declared an annual event.

The number of spectators increased each year and grew to one million by the Depression years.  The parade was postponed during World War II.  In 1945, the soldiers came home and people lined the streets again to see the first postwar parade.

The audience became national in 1948 when the parade was broadcast from coast to coast.  People from around the country could watch the festivities.

The Thanksgiving Day Parade has become an American tradition.  Today, 3 million people line the streets of Manhattan and another 44 million watch the pageantry on television.