#4417 – 2009 44c Thanksgiving Parade, Crowd

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.90
$1.90
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.50
$0.50
2 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63725 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 32 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-1/4 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
$7.50
- MM67150 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 45 x 32 millimeters (1-3/4 x 1-1/4 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$8.00
$8.00

Thanksgiving Day Parade
The Crowd

Issue Date: September 9, 2009
City: New York, NY

In the 1920s, many of Macy’s Department Store employees were first-generation immigrants.  They wanted to give thanks for their new life in America with a traditional celebration from their European homeland – a parade.

They held the first Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City in 1924.  The pageant featured store employees dressed as clowns and cowboys, with bands and live animals.  The procession ended, as it has ever since, with a float carrying Santa Claus into Herald Square, signaling the transition to the Christmas season.  Over a quarter of a million smiling faces watched the parade its first year.  It was hailed a success and declared an annual event.

The number of spectators increased each year and grew to one million by the Depression years.  The parade was postponed during World War II.  In 1945, the soldiers came home and people lined the streets again to see the first postwar parade.

The audience became national in 1948 when the parade was broadcast from coast to coast.  People from around the country could watch the festivities.

The Thanksgiving Day Parade has become an American tradition.  Today, 3 million people line the streets of Manhattan and another 44 million watch the pageantry on television.

Read More - Click Here


  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2018 50¢ The Art of Magic souvenir sheet Get The 2018 ‘Art Of Magic’ Souvenir Sheet with Special Animation Effect

    Own a mint souvenir sheet of three Art of Magic stamps featuring a white rabbit seeming to appear and disappear out of a black top hat.  The special animation effect was created using lenticular printing and makes this souvenir sheet a fun addition to your collection.  Get yours now.

    $3.95- $6.95
    BUY NOW
  • US Stamp Starter Kit Give Your Grandchildren the Gift of Stamp Collecting

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW

Thanksgiving Day Parade
The Crowd

Issue Date: September 9, 2009
City: New York, NY

In the 1920s, many of Macy’s Department Store employees were first-generation immigrants.  They wanted to give thanks for their new life in America with a traditional celebration from their European homeland – a parade.

They held the first Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City in 1924.  The pageant featured store employees dressed as clowns and cowboys, with bands and live animals.  The procession ended, as it has ever since, with a float carrying Santa Claus into Herald Square, signaling the transition to the Christmas season.  Over a quarter of a million smiling faces watched the parade its first year.  It was hailed a success and declared an annual event.

The number of spectators increased each year and grew to one million by the Depression years.  The parade was postponed during World War II.  In 1945, the soldiers came home and people lined the streets again to see the first postwar parade.

The audience became national in 1948 when the parade was broadcast from coast to coast.  People from around the country could watch the festivities.

The Thanksgiving Day Parade has become an American tradition.  Today, 3 million people line the streets of Manhattan and another 44 million watch the pageantry on television.