#4423j – 2009 44c Kelp Forest: Treefish and Snail

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$3.75
$3.75
1 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM642215x41mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM212650x41mm 2 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$1.00
$1.00

Kelp Forest – Treefish
Nature of America

Issue Date: October 1, 2009
City: Monterey, CA

The treefish is highly territorial.  When another treefish dares to swim into its territory, it raises its fins to display venomous spines.  If this does not frighten off the intruder, the treefish will display its aggression by pushing out its fleshy pink lips.

Like other rockfish, the treefish lives at the bottom of the sea floor.  Hunting at night, it relies on its yellow and black stripes for camouflage.  Blending in with the forest of kelp, the treefish preys on unsuspecting fish, crab, and squid.

The treefish’s coloration also keeps it hidden from predators.  Growing to a size of 10 to 14 inches, treefish have little hope of scaring off a 50-inch lingcod or 300-pound harbor seal. Hiding under rocks or crevices during the day, the treefish uses its color patterns to conceal itself in the nighttime kelp forest.  These deceptive markings are vital to the treefish’s survival.

Being small does have its advantages.  Its small size and solitary life keeps the treefish from being fished commercially.  It is also passed up by fishermen who prefer to fish its much larger cousin, the vermilion rockfish.  

The treefish has adapted well to life in the kelp forest.  Lurking in the kelp beds, it can pounce on prey or hide from a predator.  

Read More - Click Here


  • 2021 First-Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty 2021 First Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty

    In 2021, the United States Postal Service anticipated the arrival of spring with a new set of 10 Forever stamps honoring Garden Beauty.  Order yours today!

    $10.95- $64.95
    BUY NOW
  • Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels  May Include Targets, Stars, Numbers, or Grids. Set of 5 with small imperfections Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels
    Since they first appeared in the 19th century, fancy cancels have been extremely sought-after by collectors.  Act now to add five of these to your collection.  Stamps may vary, but that's half the fun!
    $12.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers honored the American flag, Alexander Hamilton, Religious Freedom, Overland Mail, NATO, and more.  This money saving offer saves you over $90!  Order your set today.
    $89.95
    BUY NOW

Kelp Forest – Treefish
Nature of America

Issue Date: October 1, 2009
City: Monterey, CA

The treefish is highly territorial.  When another treefish dares to swim into its territory, it raises its fins to display venomous spines.  If this does not frighten off the intruder, the treefish will display its aggression by pushing out its fleshy pink lips.

Like other rockfish, the treefish lives at the bottom of the sea floor.  Hunting at night, it relies on its yellow and black stripes for camouflage.  Blending in with the forest of kelp, the treefish preys on unsuspecting fish, crab, and squid.

The treefish’s coloration also keeps it hidden from predators.  Growing to a size of 10 to 14 inches, treefish have little hope of scaring off a 50-inch lingcod or 300-pound harbor seal. Hiding under rocks or crevices during the day, the treefish uses its color patterns to conceal itself in the nighttime kelp forest.  These deceptive markings are vital to the treefish’s survival.

Being small does have its advantages.  Its small size and solitary life keeps the treefish from being fished commercially.  It is also passed up by fishermen who prefer to fish its much larger cousin, the vermilion rockfish.  

The treefish has adapted well to life in the kelp forest.  Lurking in the kelp beds, it can pounce on prey or hide from a predator.