#4435 – 2010 44c Chinese Lunar New Year: Year of Tiger

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U.S. #4435
Chinese New Year
44¢ Year of the Tiger

Issue Date: January 14, 2010
City: Los Angeles, CA
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 11
Color: Multicolored
 
The Year of the Tiger starts on Valentine’s Day in 2010. The Tiger is a bold, determined, and impulsive sign, but one which can also bring hasty decisions and stubborn reactions. People born under the sign of the Tiger are thought to be lucky and courageous.
 
Each Chinese sign is associated with one of five elements (wood, fire, earth, water, metal). Metal is the dominant element in 2010, which reinforces the determination of the Tiger. It can be an invigorating combination – or a reckless one.
 
The Chinese New Year is considered to be a Lunar New Year, but it is actually based on a “lunisolar” calendar, which uses aspects of both the lunar and solar calendars. One result of this is that every several years there is a “leap month,” which is why the 2010 New Year starts on February 14th, while the 2009 Year of the Ox started on January 26th. 
 
One symbol of the beginning of a year is the narcissus. These flowers are a symbol of good fortune and prosperity in Asia (and vanity in the West). The narcissus is called Sui Sin Fah in Chinese.  A Narcissus Festival is held in Hawaii each year, celebrating Chinese culture. The festival culminates with a beauty pageant, where the Narcissus Queen is chosen.
 
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U.S. #4435
Chinese New Year
44¢ Year of the Tiger

Issue Date: January 14, 2010
City: Los Angeles, CA
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 11
Color: Multicolored
 
The Year of the Tiger starts on Valentine’s Day in 2010. The Tiger is a bold, determined, and impulsive sign, but one which can also bring hasty decisions and stubborn reactions. People born under the sign of the Tiger are thought to be lucky and courageous.
 
Each Chinese sign is associated with one of five elements (wood, fire, earth, water, metal). Metal is the dominant element in 2010, which reinforces the determination of the Tiger. It can be an invigorating combination – or a reckless one.
 
The Chinese New Year is considered to be a Lunar New Year, but it is actually based on a “lunisolar” calendar, which uses aspects of both the lunar and solar calendars. One result of this is that every several years there is a “leap month,” which is why the 2010 New Year starts on February 14th, while the 2009 Year of the Ox started on January 26th. 
 
One symbol of the beginning of a year is the narcissus. These flowers are a symbol of good fortune and prosperity in Asia (and vanity in the West). The narcissus is called Sui Sin Fah in Chinese.  A Narcissus Festival is held in Hawaii each year, celebrating Chinese culture. The festival culminates with a beauty pageant, where the Narcissus Queen is chosen.