#4459 – 2010 44c Adopt a Shelter Pet: Boston Terrier

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U.S. #4459
Animal Rescue

Issue Date: April 30, 2010
City: North Hollywood, CA
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75
Just rescued from a shelter, the Pit Bull’s first visit to the veterinarian was not good news.  He tested positive for heartworm, which is deadly if untreated. Its new owner debated her options – returning the dog, euthanasia, or beginning a costly and time-consuming treatment. Having bonded with her new dog, the owner decided on treatment. After weeks of daily visits to the pet hospital, the Pit Bull was free of heartworm. He now lives a happy and playful life in his new home.
 
Accidental or misguided breeding is a major contributing factor in the number of dogs given up to shelters each year. 
 
Accidental breeding occurs when the dog’s pregnancy is unwanted and unplanned, and often involves mixed breeds. Because most people prefer a purebred, the offspring frequently end up in a shelter or in a setting where they will also have accidental litters.
 
Misguided breeding is intentional, but without the foresight, ethics, and humane care required by professional breeders. Often driven by financial gain, these owners show little concern for responsible litter management or finding good, long-term homes.
 
To halt the cycle, most shelters have a procedure to spay or neuter all adopted pets before they’re sent to new homes.
 
 
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U.S. #4459
Animal Rescue

Issue Date: April 30, 2010
City: North Hollywood, CA
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75
Just rescued from a shelter, the Pit Bull’s first visit to the veterinarian was not good news.  He tested positive for heartworm, which is deadly if untreated. Its new owner debated her options – returning the dog, euthanasia, or beginning a costly and time-consuming treatment. Having bonded with her new dog, the owner decided on treatment. After weeks of daily visits to the pet hospital, the Pit Bull was free of heartworm. He now lives a happy and playful life in his new home.
 
Accidental or misguided breeding is a major contributing factor in the number of dogs given up to shelters each year. 
 
Accidental breeding occurs when the dog’s pregnancy is unwanted and unplanned, and often involves mixed breeds. Because most people prefer a purebred, the offspring frequently end up in a shelter or in a setting where they will also have accidental litters.
 
Misguided breeding is intentional, but without the foresight, ethics, and humane care required by professional breeders. Often driven by financial gain, these owners show little concern for responsible litter management or finding good, long-term homes.
 
To halt the cycle, most shelters have a procedure to spay or neuter all adopted pets before they’re sent to new homes.