#4472 – 2010 44c Scouting

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- MM62250 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 32 x 47 millimeters (1-1/4 x 1-7/8 inches)
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U.S. #4472
44¢ Scouting

Issue Date: July 27, 2010
City: Fort A.P. Hill, VA
 
Although the issuance of this stamp coincided with the 100th anniversary of the Boy Scouts, officials insisted that it honored all organizations that embody the ideals of scouting.  That decision contradicted a long-standing policy that stated the U.S.P.S. would not recognize organizations.  To explain the contradiction, officials further claimed the stamp commemorated the "activity" of scouting, rather than any individual organization.
 
The stamp was designed by Craig Frazier, working under the direction of Terry McCaffrey, manager of stamp development for the Postal Service.  The design is a "dual read," or an image within an image.  The background features a silhouette that suggests a bygone era, while the foreground image pictures a scout dressed in today's modern uniform.
 
Scouting
 In 1909, American William Boyce became lost on the foggy streets of London. A boy came to Boyce’s aid, guiding him to his destination. When Boyce offered a tip, the boy said, “I am a Scout. I won’t take anything for doing a good turn.” Boyce was so impressed with British Scouting that he brought the idea home to the U.S., founding the Boy Scouts of America in 1910.
 
What began as a single “good turn” on a foggy London night has evolved into a national organization whose members do good deeds. During World War I, Scouts sold $147 million in Liberty Bonds. 
 
Scouting provides an educational program for boys, taught through fun and adventure. With overnight camping, many physical activities, and volunteer work, Boy Scouts gain self-confidence plus learn teamwork and responsibility. The results are impressive – one of every three West Point cadets was a Boy Scout. And, of the 435 members of the 2010 U.S. Congress, 211 participated in Scouting.
 
The Boy Scouts of America kicked off their 100th anniversary with “A Year of Celebration.” The campaign challenges Boy Scouts to serve as leaders, learn new skills, and participate in community service projects in 2010. Altogether, over 2.7 million U.S. Scouts will step up to the challenge.
 
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U.S. #4472
44¢ Scouting

Issue Date: July 27, 2010
City: Fort A.P. Hill, VA
 
Although the issuance of this stamp coincided with the 100th anniversary of the Boy Scouts, officials insisted that it honored all organizations that embody the ideals of scouting.  That decision contradicted a long-standing policy that stated the U.S.P.S. would not recognize organizations.  To explain the contradiction, officials further claimed the stamp commemorated the "activity" of scouting, rather than any individual organization.
 
The stamp was designed by Craig Frazier, working under the direction of Terry McCaffrey, manager of stamp development for the Postal Service.  The design is a "dual read," or an image within an image.  The background features a silhouette that suggests a bygone era, while the foreground image pictures a scout dressed in today's modern uniform.
 
Scouting
 In 1909, American William Boyce became lost on the foggy streets of London. A boy came to Boyce’s aid, guiding him to his destination. When Boyce offered a tip, the boy said, “I am a Scout. I won’t take anything for doing a good turn.” Boyce was so impressed with British Scouting that he brought the idea home to the U.S., founding the Boy Scouts of America in 1910.
 
What began as a single “good turn” on a foggy London night has evolved into a national organization whose members do good deeds. During World War I, Scouts sold $147 million in Liberty Bonds. 
 
Scouting provides an educational program for boys, taught through fun and adventure. With overnight camping, many physical activities, and volunteer work, Boy Scouts gain self-confidence plus learn teamwork and responsibility. The results are impressive – one of every three West Point cadets was a Boy Scout. And, of the 435 members of the 2010 U.S. Congress, 211 participated in Scouting.
 
The Boy Scouts of America kicked off their 100th anniversary with “A Year of Celebration.” The campaign challenges Boy Scouts to serve as leaders, learn new skills, and participate in community service projects in 2010. Altogether, over 2.7 million U.S. Scouts will step up to the challenge.