#4496 – 2011 44c Quill and Inkwell, coil

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.80FREE with 470 points!
$1.80
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.30
$0.30
6 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM638215x33mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM216829x33mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420430x34mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50

U.S. #4496
2011 44¢ Quill and Inkwell Coil

Issue Date: February 14, 2011

City: Kansas City, MO

Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America

Printing Method: Offset, Microprint "USPS"

Color: Multicolored

 
Thomas Jefferson at first seemed an unlikely candidate to draft America’s Declaration of Independence. He attended Congressional sessions rarely and spoke little. “I never heard him utter three sentences together,” wrote John Adams. Despite that, Jefferson was the obvious choice, having “the Reputation of a masterly Pen,” according to Adams, and “no competition… in Elocution and public debate.” 
 
The Declaration was approved by the committee formed for its creation. It faced a stronger test in the debate by the Continental Congress, but eventually won approval on July 2, 1776.
 
Legend says John Hancock signed his name with a great flourish and declared, “There, I guess King George will be able to read that!” In truth, Hancock’s signature was the only one given that day. On July 4th, members of Congress approved the final wording of the manuscript. Neither the king nor the British Ministry “needed their spectacles” to read America’s declaration of liberty.
 
In 1863, in his Gettysburg Address, Abraham Lincoln called Jefferson’s document “the birth of a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.” What Jefferson created with his quill pen endures today – as the United States of America.
 
Read More - Click Here


  • 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Bugs Bunny 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Bugs Bunny

    In 2020, the United States Postal Service issued a set of 10 new Forever stamps picturing some of Bugs' most iconic costumes.  Add these popular stamps to your collection now!

    $10.95- $21.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2019 Complete Year Set of U.S. Commemoratives and Regular Issues - 116 Stamps 2019 Complete Year Set Stamps

    Save time and money with this year-set. You'll receive every major Scott number issued in 2019 – including the Priority and Express Mail stamps – in one order. It's the easy way to keep your collection up to date. 

    $126.00- $171.00
    BUY NOW
  • 1/2 lb. US Mixture, on/off paper US 1/2 Pound Stamp Mixture

    This fun mixture of U.S. stamps is made up of completely random years, and will contain both used stamps on and off paper. It is packaged by weight, and you will get a full 1/2 lb of stamps to sort through and identify- hours of fun at your kitchen table!

    $19.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #4496
2011 44¢ Quill and Inkwell Coil

Issue Date: February 14, 2011

City: Kansas City, MO

Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America

Printing Method: Offset, Microprint "USPS"

Color: Multicolored

 
Thomas Jefferson at first seemed an unlikely candidate to draft America’s Declaration of Independence. He attended Congressional sessions rarely and spoke little. “I never heard him utter three sentences together,” wrote John Adams. Despite that, Jefferson was the obvious choice, having “the Reputation of a masterly Pen,” according to Adams, and “no competition… in Elocution and public debate.” 
 
The Declaration was approved by the committee formed for its creation. It faced a stronger test in the debate by the Continental Congress, but eventually won approval on July 2, 1776.
 
Legend says John Hancock signed his name with a great flourish and declared, “There, I guess King George will be able to read that!” In truth, Hancock’s signature was the only one given that day. On July 4th, members of Congress approved the final wording of the manuscript. Neither the king nor the British Ministry “needed their spectacles” to read America’s declaration of liberty.
 
In 1863, in his Gettysburg Address, Abraham Lincoln called Jefferson’s document “the birth of a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.” What Jefferson created with his quill pen endures today – as the United States of America.