#4497 – 2011 First-Class Forever Stamp - Latin Music Legends: Tito Puente

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.90FREE with 330 points!
$1.90
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.50
$1.50
2 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM62232x47mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$4.75
$4.75
U.S. #4497
2011 44¢ Tito Puente
Latin Music Legends

Issue Date: March 16, 2011

City: Austin, TX

Printed By: Avery Dennison

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: Multicolored

 

At the start of World War II, Tito Puente (1923-2000) was just a high school kid, but was playing with the hottest Latino bands in New York City. He was already a talented musician and excelled at sight-reading – able to play music at first read. Puente attended high school and played with well-known acts like Machito’s Orchestra, Los Happy Boys, and the Brothers Morales Orchestra on weekends. This was interrupted when he was drafted into the Navy. 
 
Puente played saxophone and drums for his ship’s band during the war. A pilot helped him learn how to arrange music. After the war, Puente studied music theory, conducting, and orchestration at the Juilliard School of Music. He still played regularly, usually on the timbales – a pair of shallow drums with a cowbell or cymbals. Puente formed a new group, the Piccadilly Boys, and soon rose to the top of the mambo/salsa scene.
 
There are stories told how Puente won the title “King of Latin Music” after his band beat one led by Perez Prado in a competition. Also known as “King of the Mambo” and El Rey del Timbal (“King of the Timbales”), Puente was usually just called “the King.” In 2000, the Library of Congress named him a “Living Legend.” For over 60 years, Tito Puente ruled the Latin music scene.

 

Read More - Click Here


  • 1998-2019 U.S. Semi-Postal Stamps, plus FREE 2014 Imperforate Semi-Postal, 8 stamps 1998-2019 U.S. Semi-Postal Stamps

    Semi-postal stamps are issued to serve a double purpose.  Priced higher than regular postage, they pay the current mailing rate plus an added amount contributed to a charitable cause.  As of 2019, eight semi-postal (sometimes called "fundraising") stamps had been issued.  Now you can get them in one easy order and receive the B5a imperforate semi-postal FREE!

    $13.50
    BUY NOW
  • 1990s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 100 First Day Covers Issued During the 1990s
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers highlighted Looney Tunes characters, statehood anniversaries, Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, Elvis Presley, Dorothy Parker, and more.  Order your set today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1922-32 Regular Issues, 24 stamps, used 1922-32 Regular Issues, 24 used stamps

    This set of 24 postally used 1922-32 regular issues stamps is a great addition to your collection. Order today to receive: 571, 610, 632, 634, 635, 636, 637, 638, 639, 640, 641, 642, 653,684, 685, 692, 693, 694, 697, 698, 699, 700, 701, and 720.

    $6.25
    BUY NOW

U.S. #4497
2011 44¢ Tito Puente
Latin Music Legends

Issue Date: March 16, 2011

City: Austin, TX

Printed By: Avery Dennison

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: Multicolored

 


At the start of World War II, Tito Puente (1923-2000) was just a high school kid, but was playing with the hottest Latino bands in New York City. He was already a talented musician and excelled at sight-reading – able to play music at first read. Puente attended high school and played with well-known acts like Machito’s Orchestra, Los Happy Boys, and the Brothers Morales Orchestra on weekends. This was interrupted when he was drafted into the Navy. 
 
Puente played saxophone and drums for his ship’s band during the war. A pilot helped him learn how to arrange music. After the war, Puente studied music theory, conducting, and orchestration at the Juilliard School of Music. He still played regularly, usually on the timbales – a pair of shallow drums with a cowbell or cymbals. Puente formed a new group, the Piccadilly Boys, and soon rose to the top of the mambo/salsa scene.
 
There are stories told how Puente won the title “King of Latin Music” after his band beat one led by Perez Prado in a competition. Also known as “King of the Mambo” and El Rey del Timbal (“King of the Timbales”), Puente was usually just called “the King.” In 2000, the Library of Congress named him a “Living Legend.” For over 60 years, Tito Puente ruled the Latin music scene.