#4502 – 2011 First-Class Forever Stamp - Celebrate!

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. iFREE with 330 points!
$1.80
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.20
6 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM214510 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 35 x 30 millimeters ( 1-3/8 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.50
- MM63625 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50

 U.S. #4502
2011 44¢ Celebrate!

Issue Date: March 25, 2011

City: Cleveland, OH

Printed By: American Packaging Corp.

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: Multicolored


 
Around the world, celebrations are a time for family and friends to come together to honor many happy occasions. From birthdays and anniversaries to new jobs and well-deserved retirements, celebrations are a time of joy and togetherness.
 
The second “Celebrate!” stamp issued by the U.S. Postal Service was inspired by art director Phil Jordan’s visit to the Museum of Neon Art in Los Angeles. Drawn to the exciting imagery and vivid colors, Jordan recognized that “The mechanics would be a monumental challenge.” He knew, however, the end result would be worth it. 
 
Jordan selected fine-artist Michael Flechtner to design America’s first neon stamp. Flechtner found his inspiration for the stamp in a fireworks display, noting that “...fireworks, with all their color, light, and motion, was the embodiment of a celebration.” 
 
Flechtner created a 34” by 44” design and then heated glass tubing to 1400 degrees Fahrenheit so it could be bent into letters and fireworks. To create the red-orange color, he filled some tubes with neon gas. The blue color was created by argon and mercury, while the other colors were made with phosphor coatings inside the tubes. The result is one of the most vibrant U.S. stamps ever issued, capturing the fun of a celebration and fireworks display with glowing neon.
 
 
Read More - Click Here

  • U.S. Album with 100 postally used stamps, 1,000 hinges, and a free stamp collecting guide U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps 3-Volume American Heirloom Album

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Mystic Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Volume I, 1847-1934 Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

 U.S. #4502
2011 44¢ Celebrate!

Issue Date: March 25, 2011

City: Cleveland, OH

Printed By: American Packaging Corp.

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: Multicolored


 

Around the world, celebrations are a time for family and friends to come together to honor many happy occasions. From birthdays and anniversaries to new jobs and well-deserved retirements, celebrations are a time of joy and togetherness.
 
The second “Celebrate!” stamp issued by the U.S. Postal Service was inspired by art director Phil Jordan’s visit to the Museum of Neon Art in Los Angeles. Drawn to the exciting imagery and vivid colors, Jordan recognized that “The mechanics would be a monumental challenge.” He knew, however, the end result would be worth it. 
 
Jordan selected fine-artist Michael Flechtner to design America’s first neon stamp. Flechtner found his inspiration for the stamp in a fireworks display, noting that “...fireworks, with all their color, light, and motion, was the embodiment of a celebration.” 
 
Flechtner created a 34” by 44” design and then heated glass tubing to 1400 degrees Fahrenheit so it could be bent into letters and fireworks. To create the red-orange color, he filled some tubes with neon gas. The blue color was created by argon and mercury, while the other colors were made with phosphor coatings inside the tubes. The result is one of the most vibrant U.S. stamps ever issued, capturing the fun of a celebration and fireworks display with glowing neon.