#4524b – 2011 First-Class Forever Stamp - Go Green: Fix Water Leaks

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$2.50
$2.50
1 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM641215x38mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM214238x38mm 15 Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$1.50
$1.50
 
U.S. #4524b

2011 44¢ Fix Water Leaks

Go Green


Issue Date: April 14, 2011

City: Washington, DC

Quantity: 160,000,000

Printed By: Avery Dennison

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: Multicolored

 
The still of the night is disrupted by the sound that drives people crazy when they are trying to sleep: Drip…drip…drip… The faucet sounds like a ticking clock, leaving the sleepless wincing at each inevitable drip. But leaky faucets are much more than an annoyance; they are also the sound of money going down the drain and the waste of clean water. 
 
A typical drop of water doesn’t seem like much, as the average size from a sink faucet is about a quarter of a milliliter (bigger in bathtub leaks). Yet when it appears at a drop per second, hour after hour, day after day…the amount of water can be impressive. That adds up to over 86,000 drops, or more than five gallons per day per faucet.
 
Leaks have greater costs than a good night’s rest and inflated water bill. An estimated 14% of private U.S. water consumption is wasted by leaky faucets. That is water which communities must pay to filter, sanitize, and transport. In areas with low supplies of water, the impact is much more meaningful. Leaks can also be a sign of plumbing problems elsewhere that can result in damage to our homes.
 
So while that one tiny drop of water may not seem like much, it can mean a loss of over eight tons of water each year. And that is something that might really keep people up at night.
 

 
 
Read More - Click Here


  • Latvia Map Stamps - Imperforate block of 16 with map on reverse, one imperforate single plus FREE album page and mounts Latvia Map Stamps

    Own rare World War I stamp artifacts most collectors have never even seen.  The first stamps of Latvia – printed on German military maps over 100 years ago. Order yours today!

    $36.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Baseball, Artcraft First Day Portraits, Set of 5 Legends of Baseball First Day Cover Set
    This set includes five special-edition First Day Covers featuring the 2000 Legends of Baseball US stamps. Each cover was canceled on the stamps' first day of issue and includes a large vintage photograph of the baseball player pictured on the stamp. Order yours today!
    $29.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Hollywood Full Pane Cover Mix - selections may vary Legends of Hollywood Full Pan Cover Mix
    These panes are really neat – they feature additional images of each star plus a brief biography.  These full pane covers were produced in small numbers. Selections vary – let us choose five covers to add to your collection today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #4524b

2011 44¢ Fix Water Leaks

Go Green


Issue Date: April 14, 2011

City: Washington, DC

Quantity: 160,000,000

Printed By: Avery Dennison

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: Multicolored

 
The still of the night is disrupted by the sound that drives people crazy when they are trying to sleep: Drip…drip…drip… The faucet sounds like a ticking clock, leaving the sleepless wincing at each inevitable drip. But leaky faucets are much more than an annoyance; they are also the sound of money going down the drain and the waste of clean water. 
 
A typical drop of water doesn’t seem like much, as the average size from a sink faucet is about a quarter of a milliliter (bigger in bathtub leaks). Yet when it appears at a drop per second, hour after hour, day after day…the amount of water can be impressive. That adds up to over 86,000 drops, or more than five gallons per day per faucet.
 
Leaks have greater costs than a good night’s rest and inflated water bill. An estimated 14% of private U.S. water consumption is wasted by leaky faucets. That is water which communities must pay to filter, sanitize, and transport. In areas with low supplies of water, the impact is much more meaningful. Leaks can also be a sign of plumbing problems elsewhere that can result in damage to our homes.
 
So while that one tiny drop of water may not seem like much, it can mean a loss of over eight tons of water each year. And that is something that might really keep people up at night.