#4541 – 2011 First-Class Forever Stamp - American Scientists: Melvin Calv

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.80
$1.80
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.40
$1.40
1 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM21645 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 30 x 37 millimeters (1-3/16 x 1-7/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.95
$0.95
U.S. #4541
2011 44¢ Melvin Calvin
American Scientists
 
Issue Date: June 16, 2011
City: St. Paul, MN
Quantity: 30,000,000
Printed By:  Banknote Corporation of America, Sennett Security Products
Printing Method: Offset
Color: multicolored
 
A high school teacher criticized student Melvin Calvin (1911-1997) for not gathering all the data before arriving at his answers, and said he’d never make a scientist. The teacher was proven wrong when Calvin built an internationally renowned career that included a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1961. 
 
Years later, Calvin addressed the comments in his 1992 autobiography. He wrote, “It’s no trick to get the right answer when you have all the data. The real creative trick is to get the right answer when you have only half of the data in hand and half of it is wrong and you don’t know which half is wrong.”
 
Calvin’s creativity led to breakthrough research regarding photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert sunlight into energy. The conversion of carbon dioxide into organic molecules is called the “Calvin Cycle,” because of his work. His Nobel presenter credited Calvin with “the complete clarification of an extremely intricate problem.” 
 
Calvin worked at Berkeley from 1937 to 1980, where he strongly encouraged cooperation among different scientific disciplines. The Berkeley bioscience lab, nicknamed the “Calvin Carousel,” was officially named the Melvin Calvin Laboratory after he retired. Time magazine gave Calvin a different nickname – “Mr. Photosynthesis.”
Read More - Click Here


  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2018 50¢ The Art of Magic souvenir sheet Get The 2018 ‘Art Of Magic’ Souvenir Sheet with Special Animation Effect

    Own a mint souvenir sheet of three Art of Magic stamps featuring a white rabbit seeming to appear and disappear out of a black top hat.  The special animation effect was created using lenticular printing and makes this souvenir sheet a fun addition to your collection.  Get yours now.

    $3.95- $6.95
    BUY NOW
  • US Stamp Starter Kit Give Your Grandchildren the Gift of Stamp Collecting

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #4541
2011 44¢ Melvin Calvin
American Scientists
 

Issue Date: June 16, 2011
City: St. Paul, MN
Quantity: 30,000,000
Printed By:  Banknote Corporation of America, Sennett Security Products
Printing Method: Offset
Color: multicolored
 

A high school teacher criticized student Melvin Calvin (1911-1997) for not gathering all the data before arriving at his answers, and said he’d never make a scientist. The teacher was proven wrong when Calvin built an internationally renowned career that included a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1961. 
 
Years later, Calvin addressed the comments in his 1992 autobiography. He wrote, “It’s no trick to get the right answer when you have all the data. The real creative trick is to get the right answer when you have only half of the data in hand and half of it is wrong and you don’t know which half is wrong.”
 
Calvin’s creativity led to breakthrough research regarding photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert sunlight into energy. The conversion of carbon dioxide into organic molecules is called the “Calvin Cycle,” because of his work. His Nobel presenter credited Calvin with “the complete clarification of an extremely intricate problem.” 
 
Calvin worked at Berkeley from 1937 to 1980, where he strongly encouraged cooperation among different scientific disciplines. The Berkeley bioscience lab, nicknamed the “Calvin Carousel,” was officially named the Melvin Calvin Laboratory after he retired. Time magazine gave Calvin a different nickname – “Mr. Photosynthesis.”