#4546l – 2011 First-Class Forever Stamp - Pioneers of American Design: Gilbert Rohde - Electric Clock

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$2.25
$2.25
1 More - Click Here

U.S. #4546l

2011 44¢ Pioneers of American Industrial Design – 

Gilbert Rohde

 

Issue Date: June 29, 2011

City: New York, NY

Quantity: 36,000,000

Printed By:  Avery Dennison

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: multicolored

 

Atrip to Europe transfigured designer Gilbert Rohde’s career.  After visiting the Bauhaus School in Germany, Rohde (1894-1944) was impressed by its dedication to sleek modernism and idea of an item’s function being critical to its form.  The son of a cabinetmaker, Rohde had been working as a catalogue illustrator.  Bauhaus changed all that.  

 

The institute was perhaps the first school specializing in modernist design.  Rohde absorbed its concepts and brought them back to the U.S.  He opened a design business, and soon a contract with then-struggling Herman Miller Furniture Company gave him the platform to display his vision. 

 

Rohde convinced owner Dirk Jan De Pree that the decreasing size of modern homes required furniture that was more functional and less ornate.  De Pree agreed, and Rohde had his first designs ready by the start of the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair, where they were a great success.  By 1939, Rohde had expanded his designs into office furniture.

 

Rohde believed in multi-purpose designs, such as a coffee table doubling as a bookcase.  His designs often could be altered to suit an owner’s needs, such as the sectional sofa he first introduced.  Rohde’s modular, streamlined approach marked an important shift in how Americans view their homes. 

Read More - Click Here

  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2017 Commemorative Year Set 2017 U.S. Commemorative Year Set

    Get every US commemorative stamp issued in 2017.  Each stamp showcases important history, people, and events from American culture.  With this set you'll receive stamps from popular series like Lunar New Year and Love.  Plus you'll receive the Nebraska and Mississippi Statehood stamps, Dorothy Height, John F. Kennedy, and more.  It's the convenient and affordable way to keep your collection up to date.

    $31.95- $55.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1847 5¢ Benjamin Franklin, red-brown, thin bluish wove paper, imperforate U.S. #1 - First U.S. Postage Stamp

    On July 1, 1847, the first US postage stamps went on sale.  The 5¢ issue of 1847 (US #1) features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, the man responsible for organizing America's postal service back in the 1700s.  Postal clerks used scissors to cut the stamps from sheets, as perforations weren't in use yet.  Today, US #1 is a valued piece of American postal history and a lucky find in any condition.

    $450.00- $7,395.00
    BUY NOW

U.S. #4546l

2011 44¢ Pioneers of American Industrial Design – 

Gilbert Rohde

 

Issue Date: June 29, 2011

City: New York, NY

Quantity: 36,000,000

Printed By:  Avery Dennison

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: multicolored

 

Atrip to Europe transfigured designer Gilbert Rohde’s career.  After visiting the Bauhaus School in Germany, Rohde (1894-1944) was impressed by its dedication to sleek modernism and idea of an item’s function being critical to its form.  The son of a cabinetmaker, Rohde had been working as a catalogue illustrator.  Bauhaus changed all that.  

 

The institute was perhaps the first school specializing in modernist design.  Rohde absorbed its concepts and brought them back to the U.S.  He opened a design business, and soon a contract with then-struggling Herman Miller Furniture Company gave him the platform to display his vision. 

 

Rohde convinced owner Dirk Jan De Pree that the decreasing size of modern homes required furniture that was more functional and less ornate.  De Pree agreed, and Rohde had his first designs ready by the start of the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair, where they were a great success.  By 1939, Rohde had expanded his designs into office furniture.

 

Rohde believed in multi-purpose designs, such as a coffee table doubling as a bookcase.  His designs often could be altered to suit an owner’s needs, such as the sectional sofa he first introduced.  Rohde’s modular, streamlined approach marked an important shift in how Americans view their homes.