#461 – 1915 2c Washington, pale carmine red, single line watermark

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U.S. #461
1915 2¢ Washington

Issue Date: June 17,1915
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Method:
 Flat plate
Watermark: Single line
Perforation: 11
Color: Pale carmine red
 
At the time of this stamp's issue, perforation gauge was becoming a matter of debate for sheet stamps.  A 10 gauge perforation had worked well for coil stamps, but when used on sheet stamps, collectors found it difficult to tear individual stamps apart.  With increasing criticism circling, the Post Office Department decided to create a trial lot of around 90,000 stamps perforated 11 as a middle-ground between the difficult-to-tear 10 gauge and brittle 12 gauge. 

The trial stamps were sent to Washington Post Offices with a request that customers provide feedback to the Post Office Department.  The new 11 gauge proved popular, and it was decided to permanently change from 10 gauge as soon as the perforating wheels wore out.

Most of the original trial stamps were used on postage, with few being saved by collectors.  That makes US #461 fairly scarce today.  Add it to your collection now.
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U.S. #461
1915 2¢ Washington

Issue Date: June 17,1915
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Method:
 Flat plate
Watermark: Single line
Perforation: 11
Color: Pale carmine red
 

At the time of this stamp's issue, perforation gauge was becoming a matter of debate for sheet stamps.  A 10 gauge perforation had worked well for coil stamps, but when used on sheet stamps, collectors found it difficult to tear individual stamps apart.  With increasing criticism circling, the Post Office Department decided to create a trial lot of around 90,000 stamps perforated 11 as a middle-ground between the difficult-to-tear 10 gauge and brittle 12 gauge. 

The trial stamps were sent to Washington Post Offices with a request that customers provide feedback to the Post Office Department.  The new 11 gauge proved popular, and it was decided to permanently change from 10 gauge as soon as the perforating wheels wore out.

Most of the original trial stamps were used on postage, with few being saved by collectors.  That makes US #461 fairly scarce today.  Add it to your collection now.