#4671 – 2012 First-Class Forever Stamp - Great Film Directors: John Husto

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.90
$1.90
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.50
$1.50
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM637215x32mm 25 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.75
$7.75
- MM67145x32mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #4671
2012 45¢ John Huston
Great Film Directors
 

Issue Date: May 23, 2012

City: Silver Spring, MD

Quantity: 6,250,000

Printed By: Avery Dennison

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: multicolored

 
John Huston (1906-87) was once referred to as “cinema’s Ernest Hemingway” because he was “never afraid to tackle tough issues head on.”
 
Prior to moving to Hollywood, Huston worked as a boxer, reporter, artist, and cavalry rider. His actor father inspired Huston to become a screenwriter. In 1932 he wrote his first 3 movies, two starring his father.
 
Proving to be an accomplished screenwriter, Huston received his choice of films for his directorial debut. He chose The Maltese Falcon. Despite its modest budget, the film went on to receive immediate critical and public praise. It has also been heralded as the “best detective melodrama ever made.” This marked a turning point in his career. From then on, Huston directed all but one of his screenplays.
 
During WWII, Huston joined the Army and directed and produced three films considered some of the finest ever made about the war. Following the war, he made the controversial movie, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, which was called by a critic, “one of the best things Hollywood has done since it learned to talk.”
 
Huston always had a clear idea for his films and relied little on editing. According to one actor, “Most directors don’t know what they want so they shoot everything they can think of – they use the camera like a machine gun. John uses it like a sniper.”
 

 

Read More - Click Here


  • Confederate Stamp Club Introductory Offer Join Mystic's Confederate Stamp Club and Save 30%

    Collect stamps over 155 years old issued by the short-lived Confederate States of America.  When the Union shut down the mail service to the South, the Confederate States had no choice but to print their own postage stamps.  The resulting stamps are full of interesting philatelic history!

    $13.95
    BUY NOW
  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • US Stamp Starter Kit Give Your Grandchildren the Gift of Stamp Collecting

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #4671
2012 45¢ John Huston
Great Film Directors
 

Issue Date: May 23, 2012

City: Silver Spring, MD

Quantity: 6,250,000

Printed By: Avery Dennison

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: multicolored

 
John Huston (1906-87) was once referred to as “cinema’s Ernest Hemingway” because he was “never afraid to tackle tough issues head on.”
 
Prior to moving to Hollywood, Huston worked as a boxer, reporter, artist, and cavalry rider. His actor father inspired Huston to become a screenwriter. In 1932 he wrote his first 3 movies, two starring his father.
 
Proving to be an accomplished screenwriter, Huston received his choice of films for his directorial debut. He chose The Maltese Falcon. Despite its modest budget, the film went on to receive immediate critical and public praise. It has also been heralded as the “best detective melodrama ever made.” This marked a turning point in his career. From then on, Huston directed all but one of his screenplays.
 
During WWII, Huston joined the Army and directed and produced three films considered some of the finest ever made about the war. Following the war, he made the controversial movie, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, which was called by a critic, “one of the best things Hollywood has done since it learned to talk.”
 
Huston always had a clear idea for his films and relied little on editing. According to one actor, “Most directors don’t know what they want so they shoot everything they can think of – they use the camera like a machine gun. John uses it like a sniper.”