#4694 – 2012 First-Class Forever Stamp - Major League Baseball All-Stars: Ted Williams

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. iFREE with 330 points!
$1.90
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.50
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63725 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 32 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-1/4 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
- MM67150 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 45 x 32 millimeters (1-3/4 x 1-1/4 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$8.00

U.S. #4694

2012 45¢ Ted Williams

MLB All-Stars

 

Issue Date: July 20, 2012

City: Cooperstown, NY

Quantity: 20,000,000

Printed By: Avery Dennison

Printing Method: Photogravure

Perforations: Die Cut 11

Color: multicolored

 

The greatest baseball players of the past and present gathered in Boston for the 1999 Major League Baseball All-Star Game.  Before the game, an old man in a golf cart rode out to the field. Superstars and Hall-of-Famers gathered around him, bouncing like puppies, asking for autographs, all seeking their personal moment with former Boston Red Sox great Ted Williams (1918-2002).

 

Williams ranks among the all-time great hitters – 521 home runs, 2,654 hits, a .344 batting average, 2,021 walks, and 1,839 runs batted in.  The legendary numbers were all the more remarkable for the five seasons lost to military service in World War II and the Korean War.  Even his wartime duty was the stuff of legends – as a fighter pilot, he was wingman for future astronaut John Glenn. 

 

Williams had a difficult relationship with both fans and journalists, never acknowledging their cheers or boos.  In 1960, in the last at bat of his final game, he hit a home run into the bullpen.  The fans roared, urging him to come out.  Author John Updike wrote:  “Though we thumped, wept, and chanted…he did not come back.  Gods do not answer letters.”

 

But in 1999, Ted Williams – Teddy Ballgame, the Splendid Splinter, The Kid – tipped his cap to the adoring crowd.

 

 

Read More - Click Here

  • Get Mystic's exclusive Historic Postage Stamps of the United States album U.S. Stamp Starter Kit – #M11986

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps – #M8104 3-Volume American Heirloom Album – #M8104

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album – #M11954

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #4694

2012 45¢ Ted Williams

MLB All-Stars

 

Issue Date: July 20, 2012

City: Cooperstown, NY

Quantity: 20,000,000

Printed By: Avery Dennison

Printing Method: Photogravure

Perforations: Die Cut 11

Color: multicolored

 

The greatest baseball players of the past and present gathered in Boston for the 1999 Major League Baseball All-Star Game.  Before the game, an old man in a golf cart rode out to the field. Superstars and Hall-of-Famers gathered around him, bouncing like puppies, asking for autographs, all seeking their personal moment with former Boston Red Sox great Ted Williams (1918-2002).

 

Williams ranks among the all-time great hitters – 521 home runs, 2,654 hits, a .344 batting average, 2,021 walks, and 1,839 runs batted in.  The legendary numbers were all the more remarkable for the five seasons lost to military service in World War II and the Korean War.  Even his wartime duty was the stuff of legends – as a fighter pilot, he was wingman for future astronaut John Glenn. 

 

Williams had a difficult relationship with both fans and journalists, never acknowledging their cheers or boos.  In 1960, in the last at bat of his final game, he hit a home run into the bullpen.  The fans roared, urging him to come out.  Author John Updike wrote:  “Though we thumped, wept, and chanted…he did not come back.  Gods do not answer letters.”

 

But in 1999, Ted Williams – Teddy Ballgame, the Splendid Splinter, The Kid – tipped his cap to the adoring crowd.